organismic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

or·gan·ism

 (ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. An individual form of life, such as a bacterium, protist, fungus, plant, or animal, composed of a single cell or a complex of cells in which organelles or organs work together to carry out the various processes of life.
2. A system regarded as analogous in its structure or functions to a living body: the social organism.

or′gan·is′mal (-nĭz′məl), or′gan·is′mic (-mĭk) adj.
or′gan·is′mi·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.organismic - of or relating to or belonging to an organism (considered as a whole); "the organismic theory of the state"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Led by Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Mansi Srivastava, a team of researchers is shedding new light on how animals pull off the feat, and uncovered a number of DNA switches that appear to control genes for whole-body regeneration.
He makes visible what we fail to see (or do not dare to see, or gloss over) within multiple juxtapositions of light/heat that constitutes the organismic life of a single isolated individual--the invisible in the visible.
The artistic styles of these artifacts bear a closer resemblance to styles common to more-northern regions of the Near East, lead study author Eadaoin Harney, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, told Live Science in an email.
(1) Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138, USA Emails: catherineehua@college.harvard.edu (C.
In behavior analytic psychology, for example, organismic actions are held to depend on environing factors operating as occasion setters, elicitors, strengtheners, or selectors (Skinner, 1953, 1974).
Reviewed by Lucas John Mix, Associate, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.
The floor there held one last island of devivified organismic appeal: a second oversize blue human teat, also laid out on a small sheepskin, but sculpted to appear deflated--soft, inviting, and seductive, yet with its anima hollowed out, conjuring a final transformational moment of the "born" becoming "built."
Mendell has a bachelor's degree in organismic biology from Northeastern State University and is a graduate of Northeastern's Oklahoma College of Optometry.
This distinction between organismic meaning (as proposed) and conscious level meaning is usually not recognized until we find ourselves in unusual (for us) circumstances.
"While in many systems we know that parenting behavior can be affected by your environment, we now have evidence that genetics can play an important role as well," Hopi Hoekstra, professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology and lead author, said in a (https://eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-04/hu-tfo041817.php) press release.
Mahadevan, a Wyss core faculty member as well as the Lola England de Valpine Professor of Applied Mathematics, Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, and Professor of Physics at Harvard University and Harvard SEAS; and Ralph Nuzzo, the G.L.

Full browser ?