organology


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Related to organology: heterophony

or·gan·ol·o·gy

 (ôr′gə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.
2. The branch of musicology that deals with musical instruments and their construction, acoustic properties, classification, history, and broader cultural context.

or′gan·o·log′ic (ôr′gə-nə-lŏj′ĭk, ôr-găn′ə-), or′gan·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

organology

(ˌɔːɡəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Biology) the study of the structure and function of the organs of animals and plants
organological adj
ˌorganˈologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

organology

the study of the organs of plants and animals. — organologist, n. — organologic, organological, adj.
See also: Animals
the study of the structure and organs of plants and animals. — organologist, n. — organologic, organological, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
With response to the problem delineated in this fashion, the possibility contained in the term "organology" may suggest itself as a tentative solution, if it is taken to refer to an organ or organic function not only as an object, but as the source of a certain intelligibility and intelligence.
Comparative Organology In Applied Veterinary Histology, Second Edition; pp.543 - 544, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, London.
The essay writers come from a variety of backgrounds, experiences, and areas of expertise, including historiography, organology, ethnography, and criticism, among others.
Paper, $35.00--In the three parts (Toward Organology; Romantic Organology: Toward a Technological Metaphysics of Judgment; and After Organology) of his impressive nine-chapter volume, Weatherby opens a new conversation about what is at stake philosophically in discussions of knowledge and life.
They explore the development of a new ecological form of rationality in architecture through computational logic, ecological constructivism and the concept of an ecology of separation, the concept of general organology, the bifurcation of nature, the ecological materiality of technology in terms of a critique of media and technology, the conceptualization of planetary immunity in the Gaia discourse, biopolitical thought and bioart, the ecology of communion and contagion, ecology and metafiction, ecology and cybernetics, thinking of ecological beings as spectral, a theory of devastation in terms of ecology, and a theory of value as a component of ecology.
In the 1980s, I formed a team to do an organology project because so many early evolutionist studies and even late twentieth-century textbooks offered dismissive representations of Inuit and First Nations music as just drums and rattles.
Stiegler's contribution to technocultural studies, on the other hand, is to describe something which he calls a 'general organology', understood in Simondonian terms as the co-individuation of the human, technical and social.
Grounding his assessment in late-Romantic style theory, he wrote that Macaulay "set his stamp" upon "style in its widest sense, not merely on the grammar and mechanism of writing, but on what De Quincey described as its organology, style, that is to say, in its relation to ideas and feelings, its commerce with thought, and its reaction on what one may call the temper or conscience of the intellect" (77; emphasis in original).
Gall was careless about experimental control when seeking correlational evidence for faculties in relation to his human subjects' cranial bumps and depressions, and the "science" that soon became known as "phrenology" (a term Gall eschewed while favoring terms such as "craniology" or "organology") was soon denounced (Krech, 1964).