orientation

(redirected from orientational)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

o·ri·en·ta·tion

 (ôr′ē-ĕn-tā′shən, -ən-)
n.
1. The act of orienting or the state of being oriented.
2. Location or position relative to the points of the compass.
3. The construction of a church so that its longitudinal axis has an east-west direction with the main altar usually at the eastern end.
4. The direction followed in the course of a trend, movement, or development.
5. A tendency of thought; a general inclination: a Marxist orientation.
6. Sexual orientation.
7.
a. An adjustment or adaptation to a new environment, situation, custom, or set of ideas.
b. Introductory instruction concerning a new situation: orientation for incoming students.
8. Psychology Awareness of the objective world in relation to one's self.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

orientation

(ˌɔːrɪɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of orienting or the state of being oriented
2. (Navigation) position or positioning with relation to the points of the compass or other specific directions
3. the adjustment or alignment of oneself or one's ideas to surroundings or circumstances
4. (Education) chiefly
a. a course, programme, lecture, etc, introducing a new situation or environment
b. (as modifier): an orientation talk.
5. (Psychology) psychol the knowledge of one's own temporal, social, and practical circumstances in life
6. basic beliefs or preferences: sexual orientation.
7. (Biology) biology the change in position of the whole or part of an organism in response to a stimulus, such as light
8. (Chemistry) chem the relative dispositions of atoms, ions, or groups in molecules or crystals
9. (Architecture) the siting of a church on an east-west axis, usually with the altar at the E end
ˌorienˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•ri•en•ta•tion

(ˌɔr i ənˈteɪ ʃən, -ɛn-, ˌoʊr-)

n.
1. the act or process of orienting.
2. the state of being oriented.
3. an introductory program to guide a person in adjusting to new surroundings, employment, or the like.
4. the ability to locate oneself in one's environment with reference to time, place, and people.
5. position in relation to true north, to points on the compass, or to a specific place or object.
6. the ascertainment of one's true position, as in a novel situation.
7. the general direction or tendency of one's approach, thoughts, etc.
8. the relative positions of certain atoms or groups.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orientation - the act of orienting
locating, positioning, emplacement, location, placement, position - the act of putting something in a certain place
2.orientation - an integrated set of attitudes and beliefs
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"
wavelength - a shared orientation leading to mutual understanding; "they are on the same wavelength"
experimentalism - an orientation that favors experimentation and innovation; "the children of psychologists are often raised in an atmosphere of experimentalism"
reorientation - a fresh orientation; a changed set of attitudes and beliefs
perspective, view, position - a way of regarding situations or topics etc.; "consider what follows from the positivist view"
orthodoxy - a belief or orientation agreeing with conventional standards
heresy, heterodoxy, unorthodoxy - any opinions or doctrines at variance with the official or orthodox position
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
religious orientation - an attitude toward religion or religious practices
3.orientation - position or alignment relative to points of the compass or other specific directions
direction - the spatial relation between something and the course along which it points or moves; "he checked the direction and velocity of the wind"
attitude - position of aircraft or spacecraft relative to a frame of reference (the horizon or direction of motion)
horizontal - something that is oriented horizontally
vertical - something that is oriented vertically
quarter - one of the four major division of the compass; "the wind is coming from that quarter"
4.orientation - a predisposition in favor of something; "a predilection for expensive cars"; "his sexual preferences"; "showed a Marxist orientation"
predisposition - an inclination beforehand to interpret statements in a particular way
5.orientation - a person's awareness of self with regard to position and time and place and personal relationships
self-awareness - awareness of your own individuality
6.orientation - a course introducing a new situation or environment
course, course of instruction, course of study, class - education imparted in a series of lessons or meetings; "he took a course in basket weaving"; "flirting is not unknown in college classes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

orientation

noun
1. inclination, tendency, bias, leaning, bent, disposition, predisposition, predilection, proclivity, partiality, turn of mind The party is liberal and democratic in orientation.
3. position, situation, location, site, bearings, direction, arrangement, whereabouts, disposition, coordination The orientation of the church is such that the front faces the square.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

orientation

noun
One's place and direction relative to one's surroundings:
bearing (often used in plural), location, position, situation.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
الإتِّجاه نَحو الشَّرْق، تَكَيُّف
orientering
betájolásirányorientációtájékozódástájolás
áttun; òaî aî ná áttum
yönelim

orientation

[ˌɔːrɪenˈteɪʃən]
A. Norientación f
B. CPD orientation course Ncurso m de orientación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

orientation

[ˌɔːriənˈteɪʃən] n [organization, country] → orientation f
The movement is liberal and social democratic in orientation → Le mouvement est d'orientation libérale et sociale-démocrate.
[person] (sexual, political, religious)orientation f
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation → la discrimination sur la base de l'orientation sexuelle
(= induction) → orientation f, stage m d'accueil orientation courseorientation course nséance f d'information
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

orientation

n
(= getting one’s bearing)Orientierung f; (fig)Ausrichtung f, → Orientierung f
(= position, direction) (lit: of boat, spaceship etc) → Kurs m; (fig)Orientierung f; (= attitude)Einstellung f(towards zu); (Comput: for printing) → Ausrichtung f; (= leaning)Ausrichtung f (→ towards auf +acc); sexual orientationsexuelle Orientierung
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

orientation

[ˌɔːrɪənˈteɪʃn] norientamento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

orientate

(ˈoːriənteit) (American) orient (ˈoːriənt) verb
1. to get (oneself) used to unfamiliar surroundings, conditions etc.
2. to find out one's position in relation to something else. The hikers tried to orientate themselves before continuing their walk.
ˌorienˈtation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

or·i·en·ta·tion

n. orientación, dirección.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

orientation

n orientación f; sexual — orientación sexual
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"This kind of packing has never been seen before, and it breaks the orientational symmetry of cubes relative to the vectors (directions of the x, y, and z axes in the crystal) of the unit cell," said first author Fang Lu, a scientist in Gang's group.
Orientational oxide growth of [gamma]-[Al.sub.2][O.sub.3] is detected at the surface of oxidized [Al.sub.63][Cu.sub.25][Fe.sub.12].
The dielectric response of polymers under study appears as following the orientation of dipoles moments under the electric field action, the process being called orientational polarization or "dipole polarization".
The Gaokao binds the objectives, content, and methods of school education and the learning process of students with orientational standards.
9:30 Inauguration ceremony of the annual orientational exhibition for the Association of Islamic Center for Orientation and Higher Learning, under the auspices of MP Hassan Fadlallah, at Ghobeiry municipality stadium.
The Landau-de Gennes and Oseen-Frank models are the two most widely used continuum models to characterize equilibrium orientational properties of materials in the nematic liquid crystal phase.
GOING by the theme of this 10th National Development Summit: make Nigeria great again, there is no doubt that the ship of this country Nigeria has, for some time, now been on the sail of political, economic, cultural and orientational turbulence.
Orientational behaviors and EAG responses of male codling moth after exposure to synthetic sex pheromone from various dispensers.
Differences related to orientational aspects, specifically mirroring (b, d), rather than rotation (b, q), are more difficult for children to learn during the writing process [25].
There are electronic, ionic, orientational and interfacial polarizations [16].

Full browser ?