orientator

orientator

(ˈɔːrɪənˌteɪtə) or

orienter

n
a person who orientates
References in periodicals archive ?
The testis volume was estimated by the isotropic Cavalieri method using orientator to obtain isotropic uniform random (IUR) sections.
While a totally new kind of closure, de Jesus said the cork still provides the traditional "pop" that consumers expect from corks and can be used on nearly any kind of bottling lines by adding an orientator to ensure the cork is properly placed for bottling, similar to what's needed for sparkling wine corks.
Therefore, the samples were embedded in a cylindrical block and sectioned using a microtome after choosing random orientation according to the orientator method.
Then, they were cleaved according to the Orientator method, processed for performance of the histological technique of paraffin embedding and cut to a thickness of 5 [micro]m.
They were asked to create a multi-use orientator which could be easily adjusted to incorporate any size of tappet.
Mattfeldt T, Mall G, Gharehbaghi H, Moller P (1990) Estimation of surface area and length with the orientator. J Microsc 159:301-17.
It therefore acts as a savings orientator' at the service of the Union's policies, taking large volumes of finance at international level and using them for the development of the European economy.
In the face of increasing complexity and turbulence in the environments of organizations and other social systems, the concept of viability as a superordinate orientator has gained in importance, although the term is mostly used metaphorically.