orixa


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Related to orixa: Orisha

orixa

(əˈrɪʃə)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) another name for orisha
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References in periodicals archive ?
Set in an imaginary place, Paixoes Crioulas raises fundamental questions of group dynamics in relation to the individual as well as the primacy and resilience of African culture via the various Orixa myths in Brazil.
The components of the ceremony--food offerings, prayers and praise songs, dance, elaborate dress and costume, and embodiment of specific deities in trance--foster a dynamic dialogism between the supplicants, congregants, adepts, and orixa.
Opposite to Turner, who in his music recordings always indicated the name of the author or musician, Herskovits' music recordings, which were later published in a compilation by the Folkways series of the Smithsonian, never mentioned the name of the musician, but just to which orixa that particular drumbeat was dedicated.
Os membros da familia de santo envolvem-se em roupas assemelhadas as dos orixas do candomble, mas nao desempenham o papel de seu orixa nem se vestem com roupas normalmente usadas nas festas religiosas.
Les membres de famille de saint revetent des habits apparentes a ceux des orixas du candomble, mais ils ne jouent pas le role de leur orixa ni ne se vetent d'habits utilises normalement dans les fetes religieuses.
Without making particular reference to Africa, Mami Gros-Jeanne refers to the African-derived Haitian religion of Vodun (1) and the loas, its Cuban analog of Santeria and the orisa, its Trinidadian manifestation of orsa worship in Shango and Orisha, and its Brazilian version in Candomble and the orixa.
Nascimento believes that the patron saint of the sisterhood, behind Nossa Senhora da Boa Morte, is Nana Buruku, the Old Orixa.
A fogueira de Xango-o orixa do fogo: uma introducao a musica sacra afro-brasileira.
The continuity between possession cult and carnival and the ludic, theatrical, and agonic character of both is demonstrated in that, at carnival in Bahia (not discussed by Turner, whose focus is Rio), many gremios or carnival societies are in effect extensions of local candomble nago terreiros, with many masqueraders dressing in the traditional costumes of the orixas, so much so that Bahians speak of carnival as Candomble de brincadeira (Candomble for fun), prompting Michelle Smith Okari to write that "Carnival is a candomble without trance or possession by the Orixa" and Sheila Walker to describe it quite simply as "candomble in the streets.
What the audience wasn't prepared for was the molotov cocktail of rap, hard rock and reggae they got hit with, courtesy of the Bay Area rock en espanol powerhouse Orixa.
Ode is an orixa, a kind of Oxossi, a god of the forest, of a hunter.
I can't preach that Jesus and Oxala or some orixa (deities and divine messengers in Afro-Brazilian religion) are the same thing.