orlop


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or·lop

 (ôr′lŏp′)
n.
The lowest deck of a ship, especially a warship, having at least four decks.

[Middle English overlop, floor covering a ship's hold, from Middle Low German overlōp : over, over; see uper in Indo-European roots + lōp, a running.]

orlop

(ˈɔːlɒp) or

orlop deck

n
(Nautical Terms) nautical (in a vessel with four or more decks) the lowest deck
[C15: from Dutch overloopen to run over, spill. See over, leap]

or•lop

(ˈɔr lɒp)

n.
(in a ship) the lowermost of four or more decks above the space at the bottom of a hull. Also called or′lop deck`.
[1375–1425; late Middle English overloppe < Middle Dutch over-loop covering]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orlop - the fourth or lowest deckorlop - the fourth or lowest deck    
deck - any of various platforms built into a vessel
References in classic literature ?
I should like to see him try it; I'd give him such a pair of black eyes that he wouldn't dare to show his face in the admiral's cabin again for a long while, let alone down in the orlop there, where he lives, and hereabouts on the upper decks where he sneaks so much.
And for him, this unpleasantness is the connection between the orlop deck as his belly and the hold deck as his "deep guts and kidneys"--on one hand its sheer physicality.
The Orlop restaurant has opened in Whitby, what is its Teesside connection?
A plaque marks where he was shot and you can visit the Orlop deck, where he died after receiving news of victory over the French and Spanish fleet.
The dead were simply thrown overboard, while the wounded were carried below to the Orlop Deck, beneath the waterline, where the surgeon and his staff worked amid gore and gloom.
Black Arts Movement, depicts the descent through a slave ship's orlop deck into the lower hold where Africans were stored as cargo during transport.
Bounce was afraid of gunfire and during action at sea was confined to the dark, lower orlop deck.
It tells the story of the craftsmen who built and equipped the ship and superbly captures the world of futtocks, scuppers, topsails and orlop decks.
A wreath was laid at the spot where Nelson fell by Deputy Commander in Chief Fleet Vice Admiral Richard Ibbotson with further wreaths laid on the orlop deck where he later died.