orthodox


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or·tho·dox

 (ôr′thə-dŏks′)
adj.
1. Adhering to the accepted or traditional and established faith, especially in religion.
2. Adhering to the Christian faith as expressed in the early Christian ecumenical creeds.
3. Orthodox
a. Of or relating to any of the churches or rites of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
b. Of or relating to Orthodox Judaism.
4. Adhering to what is commonly accepted, customary, or traditional: an orthodox view of world affairs.
n.
1. One that is orthodox.
2. Orthodox A member of an Eastern Orthodox church.

[Middle English orthodoxe, from Old French, from Late Latin orthodoxus, from Late Greek orthodoxos : Greek ortho-, ortho- + Greek doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

or′tho·dox′ly adv.

orthodox

(ˈɔːθəˌdɒks)
adj
1. conforming with established or accepted standards, as in religion, behaviour, or attitudes
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) conforming to the Christian faith as established by the early Church
[C16: via Church Latin from Greek orthodoxos, from orthos correct + doxa belief]
ˈorthoˌdoxly adv

Orthodox

(ˈɔːθəˌdɒks)
adj
1. (Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) of or relating to the Orthodox Church of the East
2. (Judaism) (sometimes not capital)
a. of or relating to Orthodox Judaism
b. (of an individual Jew) strict in the observance of Talmudic law and in personal devotions

or•tho•dox

(ˈɔr θəˌdɒks)

adj.
1. conforming to the approved form of any doctrine, philosophy, ideology, etc.
2. conforming to generally approved beliefs, attitudes, or modes of conduct.
3. customary or conventional; established.
4. sound or correct in mattters of theological doctrine or opinion.
5. conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early church.
6. (cap.) of, pertaining to, or designating the Eastern Church, esp. the Greek Orthodox Church.
7. (cap.) conforming to or characteristic of Orthodox Judaism.
[1575–85; < Late Latin orthodoxus right in religion < Late Greek orthódoxos=ortho- ortho- + -doxos, derivative of dóxa belief, opinion]
or′tho•dox`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Orthodox - of or pertaining to or characteristic of Judaism; "Orthodox Judaism"
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
2.orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"
conservative - resistant to change
standard - established or well-known or widely recognized as a model of authority or excellence; "a standard reference work"; "the classical argument between free trade and protectionism"
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"
3.Orthodox - of or relating to or characteristic of the Eastern Orthodox Church
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"

orthodox

orthodox

adjective
1. Adhering to beliefs or practices approved by authority or tradition:
2. Conforming to established practice or standards:
Slang: square.
3. Generally approved or agreed upon:
4. Strongly favoring retention of the existing order:
noun
One who strongly favors retention of the existing order:
Translations
تَقْليدي الرأي، مُحافِظمُسْتَقيم الرأي، تَقليدي
konventionelortodoks
ortodox
hefîbundinnviîtekinn
griežtų pažiūrųtradicinisvisų priimtas
nemainīgsortodoksālsortodoksāls, tradicionāls
ortodoxný
onaylanmışyerleşik

orthodox

[ˈɔːθədɒks] ADJortodoxo

orthodox

[ˈɔːrθədɒks] adj
[belief, method, system] → orthodoxe
[church, Christian] → orthodoxe orthodox JewOrthodox Church n
the Orthodox Church → l'Église f orthodoxeorthodox Jew njuif/ive m/f orthodoxe

orthodox

adj
(Rel) → orthodox; the Orthodox (Eastern) Churchdie orthodoxe (Ost)kirche
(fig)konventionell; view, method, approach etcorthodox

orthodox

[ˈɔːθəˌdɒks] adjortodosso/a

orthodox

(ˈoːθədoks) adjective
1. (of beliefs etc) generally accepted. orthodox views.
2. (of people) holding such beliefs. She is very orthodox in her approach to grammar.
References in classic literature ?
He promptly sent for the Adversary of Souls and demanded his freedom, explaining that he was entirely orthodox, and had always led a pious and holy life.
Cependant, mon cher," he remarked, examining his nails from a distance and puckering the skin above his left eye, "malgre la haute estime que je professe pour the Orthodox Russian army, j'avoue que votre victoire n'est pas des plus victorieuses.
But then there were some sceptical Greeks and Romans, who, standing out from the orthodox pagans of their times, equally doubted the story of Hercules and the whale, and Arion and the dolphin; and yet their doubting those traditions did not make those traditions one whit the less facts, for all that.
In the depth of my heart there was no faith in my suffering, only a faint stir of mockery, but yet I did suffer, and in the real, orthodox way; I was jealous, beside myself .
Route toward Wind River Dangerous neighborhood Alarms and precautions A sham encampment Apparition of an Indian spy Midnight move A mountain defile The Wind River valley Tracking a party Deserted camps Symptoms of Crows Meeting of comrades A trapper entrapped Crow pleasantry Crow spies A decampment Return to Green River valley Meeting with Fitzpatrick's party Their adventures among the Crows Orthodox Crows
The orthodox answer was that day could not be called the cause of night, because it would not be followed by night if the earth's rotation were to cease, or rather to grow so slow that one complete rotation would take a year.
While he, with his slashing buccaneer methods, was a distinct menace to the more orthodox financial gamblers, he was nevertheless so grave a menace that they were glad enough to leave him alone.
No one knew what her faith was--Catholic, Protestant, or Orthodox.
The clergyman's horse, stumbling with a dull blunt sound among the graves, was cropping the grass; at once deriving orthodox consolation from the dead parishioners, and enforcing last Sunday's text that this was what all flesh came to; a lean ass who had sought to expound it also, without being qualified and ordained, was pricking his ears in an empty pound hard by, and looking with hungry eyes upon his priestly neighbour.
The good and just hate thee, and call thee their enemy and despiser; the believers in the orthodox belief hate thee, and call thee a danger to the multitude.
In doing so, he had simply obeyed the laws of his nature, and we have good reason to believe that he was, to some extent, a fatalist, but of an orthodox school of fatalism withal, that led him to rely upon himself and even upon Providence.
It is, I am convinced, a strictly orthodox heart, although somewhat larger and warmer than most people possess.

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