orthodoxy


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or·tho·dox·y

 (ôr′thə-dŏk′sē)
n. pl. or·tho·dox·ies
1. The quality or state of being orthodox.
2. Orthodox practice, custom, or belief.
3. Orthodoxy
a. The beliefs and practices of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
b. Orthodox Judaism.

orthodoxy

(ˈɔːθəˌdɒksɪ)
n, pl -doxies
1. orthodox belief or practice
2. the quality of being orthodox

or•tho•dox•y

(ˈɔr θəˌdɒk si)

n., pl. -dox•ies.
1. orthodox belief or practice.
2. the state or quality of being orthodox.
[1620–30; < Late Latin orthodoxia < Greek orthodoxía right opinion]

orthodoxy

the condition, quality, or practice of conforming, especially in religious belief. — orthodox, adj.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orthodoxy - the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
unoriginality - the quality of being unoriginal
conventionalism, conventionality, convention - orthodoxy as a consequence of being conventional
traditionalism, traditionality - strict adherence to traditional methods or teachings
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
heterodoxy, unorthodoxy - the quality of being unorthodox
2.orthodoxy - a belief or orientation agreeing with conventional standards
orientation - an integrated set of attitudes and beliefs
conformism, conformity - orthodoxy in thoughts and belief
heresy, heterodoxy, unorthodoxy - any opinions or doctrines at variance with the official or orthodox position

orthodoxy

Translations

orthodoxy

[ˈɔːθədɒksɪ] Nortodoxia f

orthodoxy

[ˈɔːrθədɒksi] n
(= accepted view) → orthodoxie f
These ideas became the new orthodoxy → Ces idées sont devenues la nouvelle orthodoxie.
(= conservatism, traditionalism) → orthodoxie f
a return to political orthodoxy → un retour à l'orthodoxie politique

orthodoxy

n
(fig)Konventionalität f; (of view, method, approach etc) → Orthodoxie f
(= orthodox belief, practice etc)orthodoxe Konvention

orthodoxy

[ˈɔːθəˌdɒksɪ] nortodossia
References in classic literature ?
Angel waxed quite earnest on that rather automatic orthodoxy in his beloved Tess which (never dreaming that it might stand him in such good stead) he had been prone to slight when observing it practised by her and the other milkmaids, because of its obvious unreality amid beliefs essentially naturalistic.
In their sad doubts as to whether their son had himself any right whatever to the title he claimed for the unknown young woman, Mr and Mrs Clare began to feel it as an advantage not to be overlooked that she at least was sound in her views; especially as the conjunction of the pair must have arisen by an act of Providence; for Angel never would have made orthodoxy a condition of his choice.
Honeychurch defended orthodoxy, and in the midst of the confusion Miss Bartlett, dressed in the very height of the fashion, came strolling down the stairs.
This is a pleasing hypothesis; but there lingers yet some of the old, goodly terror of orthodoxy.
Indeed, he had once or twice essayed to introduce the Episcopal form of service, on the Sundays that the pulpit was vacant; but Richard was a good deal addicted to carrying things to an excess, and then there was some thing so papal in his air that the greater part of his hearers deserted him on the second Sabbath—on the third his only auditor was Ben Pump, who had all the obstinate and enlightened orthodoxy of a high churchman.
While the scout was speaking, he had also seated himself, and producing the ready little volume and the iron-rimmed spectacles, he prepared to discharge a duty, which nothing but the unexpected assault he had received in his orthodoxy could have so long suspended.
It was too much the way of Monseigneur under his reverses as a refugee, and it was much too much the way of native British orthodoxy, to talk of this terrible Revolution as if it were the only harvest ever known under the skies that had not been sown--as if nothing had ever been done, or omitted to be done, that had led to it--as if observers of the wretched millions in France, and of the misused and perverted resources that should have made them prosperous, had not seen it inevitably coming, years before, and had not in plain words recorded what they saw.
I will expound to you -- as I alone can -- the secret of the enginery that effected the Rattleborough miracle -- the one, the true, the admitted, the undisputed, the indisputable miracle, which put a definite end to infidelity among the Rattleburghers and converted to the orthodoxy of the grandames all the carnal-minded who had ventured to be sceptical before.
Those who are more interested in supporting orthodoxy than in being over nice concerning the kind of support they give it, often refer to these people as evidence in favour of the true faith.
1] Edward Bouverie Pusey (1800-1882), champion of the orthodoxy of revealed religion, defender of the Oxford movement, and Regius professor of Hebrew and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford.
Mademoiselle Cormon and the Abbe de Sponde belonged to that "little Church," sublime in its orthodoxy, which was to the court of Rome what the Ultras were to be to Louis XVIII.
The preacher, a man esteemed for his orthodoxy, unfolded in the ordinary manner the doctrine of the Last Judgment.