orthopaedics

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or·tho·pe·dics

also or·tho·pae·dics  (ôr′thə-pē′dĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of medicine that deals with the prevention or correction of injuries or disorders of the skeletal system and associated muscles, joints, and ligaments.

[From orthopedic, from French orthopédique, from orthopédie, orthopedic surgery : Greek ortho-, ortho- + Greek paideia, child-rearing (from pais, paid-, child; see pau- in Indo-European roots).]

or′tho·pe′dic adj.
or′tho·pe′di·cal·ly adv.
or′tho·pe′dist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

orthopaedics

(ˌɔːθəʊˈpiːdɪks) or

orthopedics

;

orthopaedy

or

orthopedy

n (functioning as singular)
1. (Surgery) the branch of surgery concerned with disorders of the spine and joints and the repair of deformities of these parts
2. (Dentistry) dental orthopaedics another name for orthodontics
ˌorthoˈpaedist, ˌorthoˈpedist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.orthopaedics - the branch of medical science concerned with disorders or deformities of the spine and jointsorthopaedics - the branch of medical science concerned with disorders or deformities of the spine and joints
traction - (orthopedics) the act of pulling on a bone or limb (as in a fracture) to relieve pressure or align parts in a special way during healing; "his leg was in traction for several days"
medical science - the science of dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention and treatment of disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

orthopaedics

orthopedics (US) [ˌɔːθəʊˈpiːdɪks] NSINGortopedia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

orthopaedics

, (US) orthopedics
n singOrthopädie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

orthopaedics

orthopedics (Am) [ˌɔːθəʊˈpiːdɪks] nsgortopedia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
An X-ray confirmed degeneration in her left shoulder joints and she was evaluated by two orthopedists, Dr.
Orthopedists mainly from North America offer 66 chapters on the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and foot and ankle, with the principles of arthroscopy for each and various procedures and their surgical approach, technique, and postoperative care.
Thus, five departments have been closed already, the resuscitation department is not working for a week, making it impossible for surgeons, orthopedists, gynecologists to work.
Orthopedists recommend that you limit jumping in class and stay in shape with weight training and nonimpact aerobics, like swimming.
In the company's executive management team, Dr Sherman will provide strategic guidance in management and technology development focused on research and clinical activities, serve as an interventional cardiologist providing the highest level of care for patients with chronic heart failure and refractory angina, oversee the Physician Advisory Board as well as collaborate with team of board-certified orthopedists, cardiologists and regenerative medicine specialists.
In 2015, an estimated 21 percent of orthopedists worked in accountable care organizations, a 3 percent increase from 2014.
The delegation consists of 15 specialists, including surgeons, cardiologists, pediatricians, orthopedists and ophthalmologists.
Orthopedists and emergency medicine practitioners from the US describe various injuries and fractures and their key facts, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment recommendations, prognosis, and common complications, often recommending treatment plans.
The program provides patients with a team of dedicated experts, including emergency room and hospital physicians, orthopedists, rheumatologists and dietitians.
Because the analysis emphasizes pre-post comparisons, only acquiring physicians who provided at least one episode of care for a back-pain patient before and after the date of their first billed MRI procedure (1,271 orthopedists and 1,033 primary care physicians) were included in the final study sample.