orthorexia

(redirected from orthorexics)
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Related to orthorexics: Orthorexia nervosa

orthorexia

(ˈɔːθəˌrɛksɪə)
n
(Medicine) a disorder characterized by a morbid obsession with eating healthy foods only
[C21: from ortho- + (ano)rexia]

orthorexia

- An obsession with eating only "healthy" food.
See also related terms for healthy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Orthorexics can be under pressure to stay fit and young while experiencing life stress on an intense, long-lasting level.
Most of our lot make unmitigated crap," she helpfully explains, "but it can all be repositioned as special food to help orthorexics recover, and sold at a huge premium.
Orthorexics are obsessed with eating "perfectly," even when their idea of perfect eating isn't nutritionally sound--and it's becoming more prevalent.
Orthorexics usually rule out sugar, salt, caffeine, alcohol, wheat, gluten, yeast, soya, corn and dairy foods, as well as those in contact with pesticides, herbicides or artificial additives.
And it is not just orthorexics who can profit from such encouragement.
Where bulimic and anorexic patients are aware of quantity, orthorexics are concerned with the quality of food - an obession with eating what they consider to be healthy foods.
DrAlex Yellowlees, medical director of the Priory Hospital in Glasgow, said orthorexics have a fastidious preoccupation with the purity of their food which has led to them being given their own eating disorder category: orthorexia nervosa.
Whereas anorexics and bulimics focus on the quantity of their food, orthorexics are obsessed with the quality, he claims.
Orthorexics can also become socially isolated as they spend more and more time obsessing about their next meal - which can prevent them from eating with family and friends.
The motivation of orthorexics stems from a longing to feel pure, healthy and natural by pursuing a rigidly healthy diet.
I am definitely seeing significantly more orthorexics than just a few years ago," the Telegraph quoted Ursula Philpot, chair of the British Dietetic Association's mental health group, as saying.