ortolan

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or·to·lan

 (ôr′tl-ən)
n.
1. A small brownish bunting (Emberiza hortulana) of Eurasia and Africa, eaten as a delicacy.
2. Any of several American birds, such as the bobolink and the sora.

[French, from Provençal, gardener, ortolan, from Latin hortulānus, from hortulus, diminutive of hortus, garden; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ortolan

(ˈɔːtələn)
n
1. (Animals) Also called: ortolan bunting a brownish Old World bunting, Emberiza hortulana, regarded as a delicacy
2. (Animals) any of various other small birds eaten as delicacies, esp the bobolink
[C17: via French from Latin hortulānus, from hortulus, diminutive of hortus garden]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

or•to•lan

(ˈɔr tl ən)

n.
an Old World bunting, Emberiza hortulana, esteemed as a table delicacy.
[1625–60; < French, Middle French < Italian literally, gardener]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ortolan - brownish Old World bunting often eaten as a delicacyortolan - brownish Old World bunting often eaten as a delicacy
bunting - any of numerous seed-eating songbirds of Europe or North America
Emberiza, genus Emberiza - Old World buntings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Red-breasted Flycatcher was a great find near Aberdaron at the weekend, while across the water, Bardsey hosted the first Yellow-browed Warbler of autumn, a Serin and a couple more Ortolan Buntings, bringing the week's total to five.
Ortolan buntings seem to be turning up less frequently in the UK than they used to, perhaps due to changes in habitat and trapping in parts of southern Europe.
-A SPELL of easterly winds has brought many scarce birds - wrynecks, red-backed shrikes, ortolan buntings and warblers - blown off course from Eastern Europe to Africa.