oscillator


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os·cil·late

 (ŏs′ə-lāt′)
intr.v. os·cil·lat·ed, os·cil·lat·ing, os·cil·lates
1. To swing back and forth with a steady, uninterrupted rhythm.
2. To waver, as between conflicting opinions or courses of action; vacillate: "The court has oscillated over the decades from more liberal to less, more conservative to less, depending upon who was president at the time of vacancies" (Gordon J. Humphrey). See Synonyms at swing.
3. Physics To vary between alternate extremes, usually within a definable period of time.

[Latin ōscillāre, ōscillāt-, from ōscillum, something that swings back and forth, swing, probably from ōscillum, small mask of Bacchus, diminutive of ōs, mouth; see ōs- in Indo-European roots.]

os′cil·la′tor n.
os′cil·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē) adj.
Word History: The history of the word oscillate shows how English words referring to technical or scientific concepts often come from Latin words describing everyday objects and ordinary life in ancient times. In a passage in his Georgics, a long poem celebrating rural life, the Roman poet Virgil describes how Bacchus is honored in the countryside by hanging small masks from pine trees. He uses the Latin word ōscillum (plural ōscilla) to refer to these hanging religious decorations, which were common in the ancient Roman world. The house of a wealthy Roman family was usually built around one or more courtyards or gardens enclosed by rows of columns, and in each space between these columns, an ōscillum was often hung. It is probable that this word ōscillum, "something that swings back and forth," is simply an extended use of the word ōscillum meaning "a small mouth, a small face" (a diminutive of ōs, "mouth"), since the swinging objects most often consisted of masks or tondi depicting faces. From the word ōscillum, "something that swings back and forth," the Romans derived the verb ōscillāre, "to ride in a swing," and the noun ōscillātiō, "the action of swinging." These are the sources of English oscillate and oscillation, words that entered English during the 1600s and 1700s as technical terms mainly used in scientific writings and similar works.

oscillator

(ˈɒsɪˌleɪtə)
n
1. (Electronics) a circuit or instrument for producing an alternating current or voltage of a required frequency
2. (General Physics) any instrument for producing oscillations
3. a person or thing that oscillates

os•cil•la•tor

(ˈɒs əˌleɪ tər)

n.
1. an electrical circuit that produces an alternating output current of a certain frequency determined by the characteristics of the circuit components.
2. one that oscillates.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oscillator - generator that produces sonic oscillations or alternating currentoscillator - generator that produces sonic oscillations or alternating current
crystal oscillator, quartz oscillator - an oscillator that produces electrical oscillations at a frequency determined by the physical characteristics of a piezoelectric quartz crystal
generator - an electronic device for producing a signal voltage
heterodyne oscillator, local oscillator - an oscillator whose output heterodynes with the incoming radio signal to produce sum and difference tones
Translations

oscillator

[ˈɒsɪleɪtəʳ] Noscilador m

oscillator

nOszillator m

oscillator

[ˈɒsɪˌleɪtəʳ] noscillatore m
References in periodicals archive ?
The rapid development of higher frequency electronics applications in the latter part of the last century has driven the development of a spectrum of oscillator technologies.
In fact, this is one of the major advantages of ring based VCO because it permits the achievement of low-cost voltage-controlled oscillator. In addition the implementation of the VCO in the CMOS technology makes the VCO tuning range wider compared with VCO in other technologies [1].
Summary: Tokyo [Japan], Feb 22 (ANI): Kyocera Corporation on Thursday today introduced a new series of clock oscillators specially designed to support multi-size and frequencies for quick-turnaround delivery requirements, qualified by Automotive Electronics Council's (AEC) reliability standards.
The precision and/or the stability of an oscillator are evaluated through the [DELTA]f/f report expressed numerically or in parts per million (ppm).
These phase-locked oscillator models are RoHS compliant and operate over the full temperature range of -30 degrees Celsius to +70 degrees Celsius.
Consider an acoustic metamaterial containing a pure Duffing oscillator, illustrated as Figure 1.
The case of a single oscillator (N =1, yielding the 3-dimensional system) has been investigated in [31] Analysis of 2N-dimensional system (3) and (2N + 1)-dimensional systems (5) is very complicated.
It is shown in this work that, for the common oscillator case, Tx PN and Rx PN have the same level of influence on the beamforming OFDM system (in terms of EVM), yet different levels of influences on the singular value decomposition (SVD) based spatial multiplexing OFDM system (in the latter case, the conclusions are the same as in [16], where open-loop spatial multiplexing MIMO-OFDM systems with zero-forcing (ZF) decoders are considered).
The key building block of the MEMS-based oscillator is the MEMS resonator, which is fabricated and encapsulated at the silicon wafer level using the MEMS First [TM] process [6,7].
This means that the researcher's appreciation of chaos is not limited to interpreting terminated plottings, but many details are observed directly (in real-time) by visualizing the motion of the oscillator. This latest feature helps to understand how the intricate motion of the oscillator is depicted in state space.
[10], respectively, applied a higher order Hamiltonian formulation combined with parameters for nonlinear oscillators. Our concern in this work is the derivation of amplitude-frequency relationship for the nonlinear oscillator equations [??] + u + [[alpha].sub.3][u.sup.3] + [[alpha].sub.5][u.sup.5] + [[alpha].sub.7][u.sup.7] + ...