osier

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o·sier

 (ō′zhər)
n.
1.
a. Any of several willows having long rodlike twigs used in basketry, especially Salix viminalis, native to Eurasia.
b. A twig of one of these shrubs or trees.
2. Any of several North American dogwoods, especially the red osier.

[Middle English, from Old English oser and Old French osier, both from Medieval Latin osera, osiera.]

osier

(ˈəʊzɪə)
n
1. (Plants) any of various willow trees, esp Salix viminalis, whose flexible branches or twigs are used for making baskets, etc
2. (Crafts) a twig or branch from such a tree
3. (Plants) any of several North American dogwoods, esp the red osier
[C14: from Old French, probably from Medieval Latin ausēria, perhaps of Gaulish origin; compare Breton aoz]

o•sier

(ˈoʊ ʒər)

n.
1. any of various willows having tough, flexible twigs or branches that are used for wickerwork.
2. a twig from such a willow.
3. any of various North American dogwoods.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French, masculine derivative of osiere < Gallo-Romance *alisaria < Frankish *alis- alder]
o′siered, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.osier - flexible twig of a willow treeosier - flexible twig of a willow tree  
withy, withe - strong flexible twig
2.osier - any of various willows having pliable twigs used in basketry and furniture
genus Salix, Salix - a large and widespread genus varying in size from small shrubs to large trees: willows
willow, willow tree - any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix
golden willow, Salix alba vitellina, Salix vitellina - European willow having greyish leaves and yellow-orange twigs used in basketry
almond willow, black Hollander, Salix amygdalina, Salix triandra - Old World willow with light green leaves cultivated for use in basketry
basket willow, purple osier, purple willow, red willow, Salix purpurea, red osier - Eurasian osier having reddish or purple twigs and bark rich in tannin
common osier, hemp willow, Salix viminalis, velvet osier - willow with long flexible twigs used in basketry
Translations

osier

[ˈəʊʒəʳ]
A. Nmimbre m or f
B. CPD osier bed Nmimbrera f

osier

nKorbweide f; (= twig)Weidenrute or -gerte f
attrWeiden-; osier basketWeidenkorb m; osier chairKorbstuhl m

osier

[ˈəʊzɪəʳ] nvinco
References in classic literature ?
I undertook to advance the money for the osiers required for his work until my osier-farmer should be in a position to supply him.
It was somewhat spacious, and formed of four forked trunks of trees placed upright, supporting cross-beams and a frame of poles interwoven with osiers, and the whole covered with earth.
Then on the bank of Jordan, by a creek, Where winds with reeds and osiers whispering play, Plain fishermen (no greater men them call), Close in a cottage low together got, Their unexpected loss and plaints outbreathed:-- "Alas, from what high hope to what relapse Unlooked for are we fallen
Now, in barge and boat; and now ashore among the osiers, or tramping amidst mud and stakes and jagged stones in low-lying places, where solitary watermarks and signals of strange shapes showed like spectres, John Jasper worked and toiled.
It proved of excellent advantage to me now, that when I was a boy, I used to take great delight in standing at a basket-maker's, in the town where my father lived, to see them make their wicker-ware; and being, as boys usually are, very officious to help, and a great observer of the manner in which they worked those things, and sometimes lending a hand, I had by these means full knowledge of the methods of it, and I wanted nothing but the materials, when it came into my mind that the twigs of that tree from whence I cut my stakes that grew might possibly be as tough as the sallows, willows, and osiers in England, and I resolved to try.
Beyond this mere look of things there was little for Brown's freshening fancy to feed on; he saw no human beings, except some gipsies trailing along the river bank, with faggots and osiers cut in the forest; and one sight no longer unconventional, but in such remote parts still uncommon: a dark-haired lady, bare-headed, and paddling her own canoe.
Over his head, from the branches of the osier, hung a beautiful harp of polished wood inlaid with gold and silver in fantastic devices.
Suzanne hid the sack in a sort of gamebag made of osier which she had on her arm, all the while cursing du Bousquier for his stinginess; for one thousand francs was the sum she wanted.
409-414) So saying, Apollo twisted strong withes with his hands meaning to bind Hermes with firm bands; but the bands would not hold him, and the withes of osier fell far from him and began to grow at once from the ground beneath their feet in that very place.