osmotic pressure

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Related to osmotic pressures: tonicity

osmotic pressure

n.
The pressure exerted by the flow of water through a semipermeable membrane separating two solutions with different concentrations of solute.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

osmotic pressure

n
(Chemistry) the pressure necessary to prevent osmosis into a given solution when the solution is separated from the pure solvent by a semipermeable membrane
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

osmot′ic pres′sure


n.
the force that a dissolved substance exerts on a semipermeable membrane, through which it cannot penetrate, when separated by it from pure solvent.
[1885–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

osmotic pressure

The pressure that must be applied to a solution, when separated from a more dilute solution by a semipermeable membrane, to prevent the inflow of solvent molecules.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.osmotic pressure - (physical chemistry) the pressure exerted by a solution necessary to prevent osmosis into that solution when it is separated from the pure solvent by a semipermeable membrane
physical chemistry - the branch of chemistry dealing with the physical properties of chemical substances
force per unit area, pressure, pressure level - the force applied to a unit area of surface; measured in pascals (SI unit) or in dynes (cgs unit); "the compressed gas exerts an increased pressure"
hypertonicity - (of a solution) the extent to which a solution has a higher osmotic pressure than some other
hypotonicity - (of a solution) the extent to which a solution has a lower osmotic pressure than some other
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A systematic investigation on the mechanical performance of shaft lining concrete at four osmotic pressures and three confining pressures was conducted in this study.
BTC of nZnO Particles under Varying Osmotic Pressures. Figure 3 shows the breakthrough curve of nZnO particles at varying pressures.
The osmotic pressures of Hank's solution and sperm cells measured in Fiske brand micro osmometer device are mOsm/kg and 306 mOsm/kg, respectively.
In experiment-I, at 300 and 280 mOsm/kg spermatozoa motility was significantly higher (Pless than 0.05) compared to 260 mOsm/kg, and NAR at 300 mOsm/kg was significantly higher than other osmotic pressures. In experiment-II, a higher spermatozoa motility was recorded at 2.0mM BHT than other groups except 0.0mM BHT.
There are microscopic gates and carrier proteins thrown into the mix (solely to torment 1st-year medical students) but the basic mechanisms are driven by these osmotic pressures. This system is an order of magnitude more elegant and precise than its man-made electrical counterparts and can operate blisteringly fast.
Addition of water to the ECF will decrease its osmolarity and water will then move into the cells until osmotic pressures are equalised.
Both external and internal osmotic pressures depend on the external and internal osmotic coefficients, respectively, and on the external salt concentration, while the internal osmotic pressure depends also on the fixed charged density that is related to the proteoglycans content,
Such chloride concentrating epithelium is typically found in freshwater organisms that must have a mechanism to maintain internal osmotic pressures when exposed to an external medium which is highly dilute relative to internal osmotic pressures.
This conclusion is in agreement with the fact that, when anuran tadpoles are exposed to increasing external osmotic stress at osmotic pressures higher than those of their extracellular media (up to 200 mOsm), they are no longer capable of sustaining an osmotic gradient (Burggren and Just, 1992).
(1989) as the difference between the osmotic pressures of the hemolymph and of the external medium, at a given salinity.
Changes in RPF, hydrostatic and osmotic pressures, available filtering surface area, and glomerular membrane permeability can upset the internal environment by increasing or decreasing GFR.