ossicles


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ossicles


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Tiny bones, especially the malleus, incus, and stapes in the middle ear.
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References in periodicals archive ?
According to the NASA website : "The ear is made up of several smaller structures that can be organized into three distinct anatomical regions: an outer ear which extends from outside the body through the ear canal to the tympanic membrane (ear drum), a middle ear, an air-filled cavity containing three tiny bones (ossicles) that transmit and amplify sound between the ear drum and the cochlea (where the sense of hearing is located); and the inner ear, composed of the cochlea and the vestibular system."
Brittle stars' skeleton is made up of embedded ossicles. Brittle stars generally mature in two to three years, become full grown in three to four years, and live up to 5 years.
In fish like catfish and minnows, the swim bladder is connected to the inner ear by a special set of bones called Weberian ossicles. This physical connection allows a greater range and probably also more sensitive hearing.
This induces an inertia-related phase lag between the ossicles and the surrounding bone, i.e., to motion of the stapes footplate in the oval window, leading to inner ear fluid displacements and pressure differences across the basilar membrane, and subsequently its displacement and a traveling wave.
Anatomical variation of co-existence of 4th and 5th short metacarpal bones, sesamoid ossicles and exostoses of ulna and radius in the same hand: a case report.
The ossicles are three bones in which part of the body?
Acetabular ossicles: normal variant or disease entity?
Although perforation of the globe was suspected, survey radiographs did not reveal any definitive fractures of the skull, scleral ossicles, or orbit.
In the striped owls, this bone was found to be ventral to the ring of scleral ossicles (RODARTE-ALMEIDA et al., 2013).
Isolated crinoid ossicles, reflecting complete post-mortem disarticulation of individuals during extended residence within the taphonomically active zone (Lewis 1980), represent one of the most abundant bioclasts in the Paleozoic rock record (Lowenstam 1957; Ausich 1997).
Among the ossicles involved, the incus was the most commonly affected.