osteoid


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os·te·oid

 (ŏs′tē-oid′)
adj.
Resembling bone.
n.
The bone matrix, especially before calcification.

osteoid

(ˈɒstɪˌɔɪd)
adj
(Anatomy) of or resembling bone; bony

os•te•oid

(ˈɒs tiˌɔɪd)

adj.
1. having a skeleton of bones.
2. resembling bone; bonelike.
[1830–40; < Greek osté(on) bone + -oid]
Translations

os·te·oid

a. osteoide, rel. o semejante a un hueso.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cementoblastoma, osteoid osteoma, cemento-osseous lesions, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma were also considered in the differential diagnoses.
In conclusion, we report a case of gallbladder carcinosarcoma with an osteoid component, which was treated by surgical resection.
Number and percentage of each pathology Pathology details n % Simple bone cyst 2 3.2 Recurrent ameloblastoma 1 1.6 Osteosarcoma 6 9.7 Osteoid osteoma 1 1.6 Osteochondroma 3 4.8 Multiple myeloma 4 6.5 Metastases 4 6.5 Marrow edema 2 3.2 Lymphoma 4 6.5 Lipoma 1 1.6 Langerhans cell hystocystosis 1 1.6 Inflammatory 4 6.5 Hemangioma 2 3.2 Fibrous dysplasia 1 1.6 Fibrous cortical defect 2 3.2 Ewing sarcoma 16 25.8 Enchondroma 2 3.2 Chondrosarcoma 3 4.8 Chondromyxoid fibroma 1 1.6 Aneurysmal bone cyst 2 3.2 Table 2.
Medulloepithelioma with heterologous osteoid component: a case report and review of literature.
(4,6,12,20) Hepatoblastomas, especially epithelial and mesenchymal hepatoblastomas, contain mesenchymal components such as fibroblastic stroma or osteoid, which makes them a very important differential diagnostic consideration in the setting of CNSET with osteoid formation.
On axial T2 sequences, there was a small round dark lesion in the dorsal aspect of the proximal metacarpal, thought to be a nidus and consistent with a diagnosis of osteoid osteoma.
At the second week, osteoid and woven bone appeared in both HA/Zr[O.sub.2]/PRP- and HA/Zr[O.sub.2]-treated groups, while just small islands of osteoid along with larger islands of fibrin remnant were found in the PRP-treated defects.
Mostly these tumours are asymptomatic and hardly impose a difficulty in treating and therefore their incidence is debatable.3 World Health Organisation (WHO) has described a nomenclature for tumours and classifies them into seven different categories.3 Group I comprises bone-forming tumours such as osteoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma.
Immense spindle-shaped fibroblast cells, apparent fibrosis, distinct and nonuniformly distributed less nucleated giant cells, and potential inflammatory mononuclear cells with osteoid or bone formation were also identified by microscopy.
Histological findings such as the amount of fibrous tissue, cartilaginous tissue, osteoid tissue ratios, and level of bone healing graded according to Huo scores were compared using the Mann Whitney U test.
The histopathological pattern of the central osteosarcoma includes the production of osteoid or immature bone by malignant osteoblasts.