osteology

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os·te·ol·o·gy

 (ŏs′tē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. os·te·ol·o·gies
1. The branch of anatomy that deals with the structure and function of bones.
2. The bone structure or system of an animal.

os′te·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
os′te·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
os′te·ol′o·gist n.

osteology

(ˌɒstɪˈɒlədʒɪ) or

osteography

n
(Medicine) the study of the structure and function of bones
osteological adj
ˌosteoˈlogically adv
ˌosteˈologist n

os•te•ol•o•gy

(ˌɒs tiˈɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the branch of anatomy dealing with the skeleton.
[1660–70; < New Latin osteologia. See osteo-, -logy]
os`te•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) os`te•o•log′ic, adj.
os`te•ol′o•gist, n.

osteology

1. the scientific study of bones and their diseases.
2. the totality of medical knowledge concerning the bones of the skeletal system. Also called skeletology. — osteologist, n. — osteologie, osteological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties
the branch of anatomy that studies the skeleton and bones. — osteologist, n. — osteologie, osteological, adj.
See also: Anatomy
the branch of anatomy that studies the skeleton. Also called skeletology.osteologist, osteologer, n.osteologie, osteological, adj.
See also: Bones

osteology

The study of bones.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.osteology - the branch of anatomy that studies the bones of the vertebrate skeleton
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

os·te·ol·o·gy

n. osteología, rama de la medicina que estudia la estructura y funcionamiento de los huesos.
References in periodicals archive ?
58) Table 4 summarizes the data on the position of 130 osteologically sexed skeletons from the whole Argaric territory (59) (n women = 68; n men = 62).
In the real world, however, one has to deal with the remarkable paucity of properly excavated, osteologically analysed and (radiocarbon-)dated grave sites.
Morphologically, these small species are difficult to differentiate osteologically when complete skulls or skeletons are available (Bogan, 1974, 1975; van Zyll de Jong, 1984); the species at Terapa cannot be distinguished on the basis of the available fragmentary material.