osteopenia


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os·te·o·pe·ni·a

 (ŏs′tē-ə-pē′nē-ə)
n.
A generalized reduction in bone mass that is less severe than that resulting from osteoporosis, caused by the resorption of bone at a rate that exceeds bone synthesis.
Translations

os·te·o·pe·ni·a

n. osteopenia, disminución de la calcificación ósea.

osteopenia

n osteopenia
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References in periodicals archive ?
Further, the report states that adverse effects such as hepatotoxicity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, lactic acidosis, lipodystrophy, osteonecrosis, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and skin rash presents a significant challenge to this market.
Here the 76-year-old, who lives in Surrey, talks about her osteopenia diagnosis and what she is doing to help her bone health.
Having osteopenia does make it easier to break a bone, but interestingly some fractures from osteopenia don't even cause pain.
A study published in the Journal of Pineal Research of postmenopausal women with osteopenia has shown that long-term treatment with melatonin, which naturally decreases in the body with age, can improve the density of bone at the neck of the femur, in proportion to the level of treatment.
People with a FRAX below 20% and no fracture history should have another DXA in 1 to 2 years if they have advanced osteopenia (T score -2.
Brittany was born with Cerebral Palsy and Osteopenia (Brittle Bone Disease).
The National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines have changed, however, for those with osteopenia, such that, previously, treatment was initiated in patients with osteopenia (a T score less than--2.
Another study found a significant risk of developing osteopenia among patients on a KGD, compared with matched controls.
Fosteum PLUS is for the clinical dietary management of the metabolic processes associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis with MenaQ7 vitamin K2 for improved bone results and cardiac safety.
Magnesium sulfate should not be used for more than 5-7 days in pregnant women in preterm labor, because in utero exposure may lead to hypocalcemia and an increased risk of osteopenia and bone fractures in newborns, the Food and Drug Administration announced.