ostiole

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os·ti·ole

 (ŏs′tē-ōl′)
n.
A small opening or pore, as of a fruiting body.

[Latin ōstiolum, diminutive of ōstium, opening; see ostium.]

os′ti·o′lar (ŏs′tē-ō′lər, ŏ-stī′ə-) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ostiole

(ˈɒstɪˌəʊl)
n
1. (Botany) the pore in the reproductive bodies of certain algae and fungi through which spores pass
2. (Biology) any small pore
[C19: from Latin ostiolum, diminutive of ostium door]
ostiolar, ˈostioˌlate adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

os•ti•ole

(ˈɒs tiˌoʊl)

n.
an opening or pore.
[1825–35; < Latin ōstiolum little door, diminutive of ōstium door]
os•ti•o•lar (ˈɒs ti ə lər, ɒˈstaɪ-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ostiole - a small pore especially one in the reproductive bodies of certain algae and fungi through which spores pass
pore - any small opening in the skin or outer surface of an animal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The family is characterized by flattened and scutate ascomata (thyriothecia), wich are usually ostiolate and develop superficially or in the cuticle of the living host's leaves; the peridium is dark coloured, mostly bluish-green, bluish-black or brown, and has a non-radiate, often meandrous interwoven cells structure (textura epidermoidea); the asci are bitunicate, clavate to cylindrical, ovate or saccate, and the ascospores are hyaline, long clavate with mostly more than two transverse septa; the pseudoparaphyses are narrowly cellular and tend to deliquesce in mature specimens and are not always present (Batista, 1959; von Arx & Muller, 1975; Wu et al., 2011; Hyde et al., 2013; Hongsanan et al., 2014).
Pertithecia are opaque, ostiolate, with blunt, narrow or beaked apex and its wall membranous, fragile, brittle with age, distinctly cellular, ornamented with appendages in the form of diversely modified and variously coloured hairs called terminal hairs.
It has been accepted by a number of workers [11, 12, 13] that closely related ostiolate and cleistothecial genera are better accommodated in one rather than in separate families as originally suggested by Cain [3].