ostracism


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os·tra·cism

 (ŏs′trə-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The act of banishing or excluding.
b. Banishment or exclusion from a group; disgrace.
2. In Athens and other cities of ancient Greece, the temporary banishment by popular vote of a citizen considered dangerous to the state.

[French ostracisme, from Greek ostrakismos, from ostrakizein, to ostracize; see ostracize.]

os•tra•cism

(ˈɒs trəˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. exclusion, by general consent, from social acceptance, privileges, friendship, etc.
2. (in ancient Greece) temporary banishment of a citizen, decided upon by popular vote.
[1570–80; < New Latin ostracismus < Greek ostrakismós banishment]

ostracism

- In ancient Greece, when it was proposed that a person be sent into exile, a vote was taken and the method of registering the vote involved putting the name on a piece of broken pottery called ostrakon; casting the vote was ostrakizein, giving us English ostracism.
See also related terms for vote.

ostracism

1. a casting out from social or political society.
2. the ancient Athenian process of temporary banishment by popular vote, using potsherds or tiles for ballots.
See also: Banishment
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ostracism - the state of being banished or ostracized (excluded from society by general consent)ostracism - the state of being banished or ostracized (excluded from society by general consent); "the association should get rid of its elderly members--not by euthanasia, of course, but by Coventry"
exclusion - the state of being excluded
2.ostracism - the act of excluding someone from society by general consent
expulsion, riddance, ejection, exclusion - the act of forcing out someone or something; "the ejection of troublemakers by the police"; "the child's expulsion from school"

ostracism

noun exclusion, boycott, isolation, exile, rejection, expulsion, avoidance, cold-shouldering, renunciation, banishment In those days unmarried mothers suffered social ostracism.
welcome, approval, admission, reception, acceptance, inclusion

ostracism

noun
Enforced removal from one's native country by official decree:
Translations
نَفْي، إبْعاد، نَبْذ، طَرْد
udelukkelse
cserépszavazáskiközösítés
útskúfun
ostrakizmus

ostracism

[ˈɒstrəsɪzəm] Nostracismo m

ostracism

[ˈɒstrəsɪzəm] nostracisme m
to risk social ostracism → risquer l'ostracisme social

ostracism

nÄchtung f

ostracism

[ˈɒstrəsɪzm] n (frm) → ostracismo

ostracize,

ostracise

(ˈostrəsaiz) verb
to refuse to accept (someone) in society or a group. His former friends ostracized him because of his rudeness.
ˈostracism noun
References in classic literature ?
Nor is this serviceable to tyrants only; nor is it tyrants only who do it; for the same thing is practised both in oligarchies and democracies: for the ostracism has in a manner nearly the same power, by restraining and banishing those who are too great; and what is done in one city is done also by those who have the supreme power in separate states; as the Athenians with respect to the Samians, the Chians, and the Lesbians; for when they suddenly acquired the superiority over all Greece, they brought the other states into subjection, contrary to the treaties which subsisted between them.
There is therefore no reason that a monarch should not act in agreement with free states, to support his own power, if they do the same thing for the benefit of their respective communities; upon which account when there is any acknowledged difference in the power of the citizens, the reason upon which the ostracism is founded will be politically just; but it is better for the legislator so to establish his state at the beginning as not to want this remedy: but if in course of time such an inconvenience should arise, to endeavour to amend it by some such correction.
After having been sentenced to a prepetual ostracism from the esteem and confidence, and honors and emoluments of his country, he will still be liable to prosecution and punishment in the ordinary course of law.
For public envy, is as an ostracism, that eclipseth men, when they grow too great.
He lounged along, smoking a large cigar, keen-eyed and observant, laying up for himself a store of impressions, unconsciously irritated at every step by a sense of ostracism, of being in some indefinable manner without kinship and wholly apart from this world, in which it seemed natural now that he should find some place.
If nothing else, I was escaping from the organized ostracism that had been our increasing portion in the university town ever since the enmity of the nascent Oligarchy had been incurred.
You should read history--look at ostracism, persecution, martyrdom, and that kind of thing.
To understand the importance of the ostracism imposed by the act of Amelie Thirion, it is necessary to add that this scene took place toward the end of the month of July, 1815.
My whole former life--my life as a slave on the plantation, my work in the coal-mine, the times when I was without food and clothing, when I made my bed under a sidewalk, my struggles for an education, the trying days I had had at Tuskegee, days when I did not know where to turn for a dollar to continue the work there, the ostracism and sometimes oppression of my race,--all this passed before me and nearly overcame me.
He said to himself that she was too light and childish, too uncultivated and unreasoning, too provincial, to have reflected upon her ostracism, or even to have perceived it.
Plus, Beth must now attend public school and make her way through the stereotyping and ostracism she finds there.
Islam's historic resistance to Christianity, based on its own theology of supersession, its disastrous experiences and memories from the epoch of the Crusades, and its imposition of shari'ah (religious law) have made conversion to Christianity and baptism in the name of the Triune God illegal and punishable by death or ostracism.