otherness


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oth·er·ness

or Oth·er·ness  th′ər-nĭs)
n.
The quality or condition of being different or of belonging to an outgroup.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

otherness

(ˈʌðənɪs)
n
the quality of being different or distinct in appearance, character, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.otherness - the quality of being not alike; being distinct or different from that otherwise experienced or known
difference - the quality of being unlike or dissimilar; "there are many differences between jazz and rock"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

otherness

[ˈʌðənɪs] Nalteridad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

otherness

[ˈʌðərnəs] naltérité f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

otherness

nAnderssein nt, → Andersartigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

otherness

[ˈʌðənɪs] ndiversità
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The story of Ariston barely recognises male/female otherness but fully recognises master/subject otherness.
He seemed to be saying that the beauty of life lay in being what we are and in being able to yield in joy to the wonders of otherness. He spoke in similes and movement, in metaphors that reached into a sphere of nonreality in order to give us a greater understanding of our reality.
"One way to imagine the scenographic history of the century for Shakespeare," concludes Kennedy, "is to see it as a series of attempts to make a home for the otherness of the texts." And as he makes clear in one apt example after another, this "otherness" has operated as something of a theatrical Rorschach for each new generation.
White's overarching theme is the nature of Otherness, as Wendy Doniger notes in her short introductory forward.
Hope and Otherness: Christian Eschatology and Interreligious Hospitality
Among the topics are the othered child in the Bible for children, toward the creation of feminist bible films, the depiction of the devil and the education of Chinese children in the Taiping Trimetrical Classic, God's destruction of humanity in the flood story for children, reanimating Judges 16 for children, and the otherness of children's bibles in historical perspective.
Kim challenges "the epistemology and politics" of "otherness postmodernism," or "the group of critical tendencies based on the privileging of difference and alterity--particularly in regards to race and gender" (1).
We offer a critique of this assumption in accordance with radical enlightenment scholarship, calling forth a return to otherness that renders the construct of individual secondary to that which is met.
Yet it never quite loses its quality of otherness, as demonstrated by its use in this recent Brussels apartment block.
They force us to recognize them as bodies as well as hunks of bronze--yet what they reflect back at us is not simply spiritedness or otherness but a synthesis that defies categorization and disturbs the gut and the mind.
The biblical accounts contained in Torah (where the land of Kush and its people is a fairly frequent reference--Moses himself supposedly was married to a Kushite woman, for one intriguing example) reveal no more "racism" (but the same "ethnocentrism") that we would find elsewhere in the Mediterranean (the author cites the work of Frank Snowden and Lloyd Thompson with approval); Kush and its inhabitants were made, early on, signifiers or images of "otherness" but not necessarily either identified as black-skinned or as particularly threatening; sometimes Kush indeed is confused with Canaan (itself a confused geographical and ethnic concept), and eventually, for more confusion, the Greek "Ethiopian" was added to the mix.
Celan, probably the twentieth century's greatest poet of otherness, suggests that we speak, see, and think in a way that will continually keep our perceptions, feelings, and thoughts open to all imaginable and unimaginable possibilities, even those that are opposite to what our words say.