otherness


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oth·er·ness

or Oth·er·ness  th′ər-nĭs)
n.
The quality or condition of being different or of belonging to an outgroup.

otherness

(ˈʌðənɪs)
n
the quality of being different or distinct in appearance, character, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.otherness - the quality of being not alike; being distinct or different from that otherwise experienced or known
difference - the quality of being unlike or dissimilar; "there are many differences between jazz and rock"
Translations

otherness

[ˈʌðənɪs] Nalteridad f

otherness

[ˈʌðərnəs] naltérité f

otherness

nAnderssein nt, → Andersartigkeit f

otherness

[ˈʌðənɪs] ndiversità
References in periodicals archive ?
It made me think of Johnson's insight that "encounters with the otherness of their wildness can evocatively mediate 'the qualitatively different otherness of God.
He explores the room for religious otherness in contemporary eschatology by investigating how and to what extent the theological integrity of the religious Other is articulated in the eschatologies of some influential contemporary Christian theologians; comparing and correlating the analyses of Christian eschatologies with contemporary eschatologies from the Muslim and Jewish traditions; and exploring avenues for reassessing otherness in Christian eschatology.
Through fusing memories of my childhood with fictional responses, I am able to depict provocative yet playful self-portraits and narratives that illustrate my feelings of discomfort, otherness and invisibility.
In a decidedly more playful second act, all five actors impress and Laura Elsworthy's central performance is a real masterclass in balancing eerie otherness and heartfelt humanity.
Booth's The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction, in which Lawrence is praised as a radical practitioner of Bahktin's dialogism, critics have recognized that Lawrence's ethics are tied to his aesthetics through his acute sensitivity to the strange otherness of the people, places, and animals that inhabit one's world.
Based on the anthropological discourse of the otherness and the limit, the theatrical discourse is essential to the discourse of interstice, its ghostly spectral character being quite transparent in the personification of the interstitial structure of theater: "If the stakes of the representation of the ghost, of the incarnation of the returning dead, actually aim, for all these theorists, at the very essence of theater, this happens because of the challenges that the representation of the invisible is placing in front of it, and opens the way to a sum of interrogations on the very status of reality in the theater.
This otherness is neither a scientific discovery nor a technological innovation based on a single universal logic strictly written in the language of mathematics.
He points to the problematic of empathy in works by Aristotle, Adam Smith, and David Hume and to the conviction (expressed in regard to contemporary literature perhaps most fully by Martha Nussbaum, but underpinning the approaches of many current teachers and scholars) that literature enriches its readers precisely by bringing otherness to us, by giving us a way to connect with what seems distant or foreign.
Text, image, and otherness in children's bibles; what is in the picture?
As teaching material, Performing otherness is a rich source for courses in theatre and performance studies, colonialism and postcolonialism, cultural studies, Indonesian history, and even, in its picture of cultural life in New York 1910-30 and Hollywood and California in the 1930s and 1940s, for courses in American Studies.
Thirty years and several volumes of poetry later, with Inside the Money Machine, Pratt is still dealing with issues of otherness, this time with being on the economic periphery.