otosclerosis

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o·to·scle·ro·sis

 (ō′tō-sklə-rō′sĭs)
n.
A disease of the ear in which the movement of the stapes within the oval window becomes impeded by abnormal deposits of spongy bone, leading to a progressive loss of hearing.

o′to·scle·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

otosclerosis

(ˌəʊtəʊskləˈrəʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) an abnormal bone growth in the middle ear which may cause hearing loss

o•to•scle•ro•sis

(ˌoʊ tə sklɪˈroʊ sɪs)

n.
formation of new bone about the stapes or cochlea, resulting in hearing loss.
[1895–1900]

otosclerosis

The immobilization of the tiny stapes bone in the middle ear caused by the formation of excess bone tissue around the oval window, resulting in progressive deafness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.otosclerosis - hereditary disorder in which ossification of the labyrinth of the inner ear causes tinnitus and eventual deafness
Translations

o·to·scle·ro·sis

[MIM*166800]
n. otosclerosis, sordera progresiva debida a la formación de tejido esponjoso en el laberinto del oído.

otosclerosis

n otosclerosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
The present series consists of a study of 50 otosclerotic ears which were subjected to stapedotomy.
With the success of the left cochlear implant, the right otosclerotic ear was no longer the only-hearing ear, and the patient was offered a right stapedectomy, to which he agreed.
Patients with mixed hearing loss, other than otosclerotic causes of conductive hearing loss, revision cases and patients with atypical findings of footplate intraoperatively (obliterative, floating and gusher types) were excluded from this study to focus only on the complications from the type of surgery and exclude complications related to the patient or surgical findings.
First surgical operation with microscope was performed in Sweden to correct otosclerotic deafness (Nylen 1924).
Long-term results in otosclerotic patients operated by stapedectomy or stapedotomy.
2,3) Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by the hyalinization of the spiral ligament adjacent to the otosclerotic focus, which affects the otic capsule in such a way that it interferes with the function of the organ of Corti.
In fact, Tillman wrote as early as 1963 that the SAL test was inadequate as a substitute for conventional bone-conduction testing and that the two approaches yielded different estimates of sensorineural sensitivity in the low frequencies in otosclerotic patients.
According to our database, 90% of otosclerotic patients will develop contralateral disease in time.