out of pocket


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pock·et

 (pŏk′ĭt)
n.
1. A small baglike attachment forming part of a garment and used to carry small articles, as a flat pouch sewn inside a pair of pants or a piece of material sewn on its sides and bottom to the outside of a shirt.
2. A small sack or bag.
3. A receptacle, cavity, or opening.
4. Financial means; money supply: The cost of the trip must come out of your own pocket.
5.
a. A small cavity in the earth, especially one containing ore.
b. A small body or accumulation of ore.
6. A pouch in an animal body, such as the cheek pouch of a rodent or the abdominal pouch of a marsupial.
7. Games One of the pouchlike receptacles at the corners and sides of a billiard or pool table.
8. Sports The webbing attached to the head of a lacrosse stick, in which the ball is caught and held.
9. Baseball The deepest part of a baseball glove, just below the web, where the ball is normally caught.
10. Sports A racing position in which a contestant has no room to pass a group of contestants immediately to his or her front or side.
11.
a. A small, isolated, or protected area or group: pockets of dissatisfied voters.
b. Football The area a few yards behind the line of scrimmage that blockers attempt to keep clear so that the quarterback can pass the ball.
12. An air pocket.
13. A bin for storing ore, grain, or other materials.
adj.
1. Suitable for or capable of being carried in one's pocket: a pocket handkerchief; a pocket edition of a dictionary.
2. Small; miniature: a pocket backyard; a pocket museum.
3. Designating the two cards that are dealt to a player face down in Texas hold'em: was holding pocket eights.
tr.v. pock·et·ed, pock·et·ing, pock·ets
1. To place in a pocket: pocketed her key.
2. To take possession of for oneself, especially dishonestly: pocketed the receipts from the charity dance.
3.
a. To accept or tolerate (an insult, for example).
b. To conceal or suppress: I pocketed my pride and asked for a raise.
4. To prevent (a bill) from becoming law by failing to sign until the adjournment of the legislature.
5. Sports To hem in (a competitor) in a race.
6. Games To hit (a ball) into a pocket of a pool or billiard table.
Idioms:
in (one's) pocket
In one's power, influence, or possession: The defendant had the jury in his pocket.
in pocket
1. Having funds.
2. Having gained or retained funds of a specified amount: was a hundred dollars in pocket after a day at the races.
out of pocket
1. Out of one's own resources: fees paid out of pocket.
2. Without funds or assets: a traveler who was caught out of pocket.
3. In a state of having experienced a loss, especially a financial one.

[Middle English, pouch, small bag, from Anglo-Norman pokete, diminutive of Old North French poke, bag, of Germanic origin.]

pock′et·a·ble adj.
pock′et·less adj.

out of pocket

adj (out-of-pocket when prenominal)
1. (postpositive) having lost money, as in a commercial enterprise
2. without money to spend
3. (prenominal) (of expenses) unbudgeted and paid for in cash
References in periodicals archive ?
ONE of the biggest financial scandals of the past 30 years is about to reach its climax, leaving millions of homebuyers badly out of pocket.
According to the American Association of Retired Persons, older Americans are already spending 23 percent of their income, on average, for medical expenses, and Snyder noted that one-third of nursing home expenses are paid out of pocket.
Pearl ran into trouble in the 1990s after being taken over by an Aussie insurance firm which abandoned it after a series of disastrous deals left policyholders out of pocket.