out-of-focus

out-of-focus

adj
not focused or sharp; blurry
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Perm, Russia, August 16, 2019 --(PR.com)-- AKVIS Refocus is image enhancement software that improves the sharpness of out-of-focus photos and also applies striking bokeh and lens blur effects.
Sharpe also noticed Middleton's ability to create wonderful out-of-focus backgrounds using limited depth of field.
More background blur illustrates a shallow depth of field largely responsible for bokeh - the aesthetic quality of the blur produced in the out-of-focus parts of an image produced by a lens.
For example, you can control how out-of-focus points look, you can change the lighting at different points, and you can blur the image as needed.
The tree habit photos in this edition apparently have been copied from the previous printed edition, rather than scanned from original slides, and so many have a slightly 'out-of-focus' appearance, immediately noticeable, for example, in the second digest on page 52.
Although with today's technology, making them out-of-focus might be a little difficult.
An out-of-focus black and white portrait captures a young girl with a wide gaze looking directly into the camera in anguish, despite her emotionless features, while her tiny breasts are tightly wrapped with a piece of cloth to prevent them from growing.
While stars in the center of the field of view might be round and sharp, those near the edges or corners of the frame often appear as elongated streaks, distorted into "seagull" shapes, or simply out-of-focus, multi-colored blobs.
He was depicted in an out-of-focus photo the department distributed Monday while requesting the public's help in identifying him.
Images taken in this mode are a hit-and-miss affair -- great when you get it right and too out-of-focus when the distance from the subject is insufficient.
This essentially cancels out the probability behind out-of-focus photographs, and seems promising upon first impressions.
Assuming sufficient excitation power and aberration control, the fundamental factor limiting imaging depth when performing MPM in tissue is the background fluorescence originating from out-of-focus areas above the imaging plane [12-14].