outcrossing


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out·cross

 (out′krôs′, -krŏs′)
v. out·crossed, out·cross·ing, out·cross·es
v.tr.
1. To mate (an animal) to an unrelated individual of the same species or breed.
2. To pollinate (a plant) with pollen from a different plant of the same species, often one that is unrelated or is of a different variety.
v.intr.
To outcross a plant or animal.
n.
1. The process of outcrossing.
2. Offspring produced by outcrossing.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

outcrossing

(ˈaʊtˌkrɒsɪŋ)
n
(Biology) the act of mating unrelated individuals
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
annuus-like group has the lowest outcrossing rate MLEs (0.76, 0.75, and 0.85 in hybrid zones 1, 2, and 3, respectively), whereas outcrossing rates for the H.
Knowing a plant's breeding biology informs growers on whether or not they need pollinators for a seed crop, and the importance of outcrossing for consistent and copious seed production.
The latter is called pollen--mediated gene flow, and may be evaluated by observing outcrossing from a source field to receptor plots.
Key words: ant-mediated dispersal; dispersal distances; genetic structure; mating system; outcrossing rate, radiolabeled seeds; seed dispersal; self-incompatibility; Trillium grandiflorum.
regnans, biparental inbreeding arising from mating among related neighbors is believed to explain the lower outcrossing rate in a native forest (0.75) compared to a nearby seed orchard (0.91) where a family structure was absent (Moran et al.
Studies document that provision of honeybees can increase both seed and lint yield of cotton via improved pollination, and outcrossing rates are affected by bee activity (McGregor 1976).
The incidence of self-pollination in primarily outcrossing plants has been documented in a variety of taxa (Levin, 1972; Schoen, 1982; Richards, 1986; Lloyd and Schoen, 1992; Klips and Snow, 1997).
Previous studies indicate that individuals that are more attractive to pollinators can have higher outcrossing rates (Brown and Clegg 1984, Epperson and Clegg 1987, Sun and Ganders 1990, Rausher et al.
For instance, the progeny of a self-fertilizing organism carry two sets of genes from their single parent compared to the progeny resulting from outcrossing, which carry only one set from either parent.