outdoorsmanship

outdoorsmanship

(ˌaʊtˈdɔːzmənʃɪp)
n
the engaging in or enjoying of regular outdoor activity
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
These boys enact rural masculinities characterized by toughness, adventure, and outdoorsmanship (Kenway et al.
Mahan as they offer how to best experience the Shawnee National Forest, a vast space of hundreds of thousands of aches spanning throughout Southern Illinois and embracing what it has for outdoorsmanship and fun along the way.
Consider, too, the relationship between San Francisco and Lake Tahoe: industrial leisure under the guise of "outdoorsmanship" has resulted in lake sedimentation and algae fertilization.
Their sense of outdoorsmanship goes little beyond the back of a truck.
His expert outdoorsmanship and fishing set "a pattern of deliberate and pleasurable behavior.
And however attenuated the English hunt was qua hunt, Darwin acquired enough outdoorsmanship to hold his own among men for whom hunting was tantamount to survival.
We must promote outdoorsmanship as well as being hunters.
Hemingway was, after all, an unabashed hunter and sport fisherman, and while he pursued and advocated practices in the best traditions of responsible outdoorsmanship, his outlook on nature was far closer to conservationists such as the current Ducks Unlimited organizations than to today's ecologists.
He called his wealthy father, who raised fighting cocks and owned a lot of real estate in Georgia, an "unsuccessful lawyer, a born loser" But he desperately wanted to impress his father, who disdained poetry, with his own outdoorsmanship and military prowess.