outlawry


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out·law·ry

 (out′lô′rē)
n. pl. out·law·ries
1. Defiance of the law; unlawful behavior.
2. The act or process of outlawing or the state of having been outlawed.
3. A proceeding, doctrine, or condition in which one convicted of a crime is deprived of the protection of the law.

[Middle English outlauerie, from Anglo-Norman utlagerie and from Medieval Latin ūtlagāria, both from Old English ūtlaga, outlaw; see outlaw.]

outlawry

(ˈaʊtˌlɔːrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Law) the act of outlawing or the state of being outlawed
2. disregard for the law
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.outlawry - illegality as a consequence of unlawful acts; defiance of the law
illegality - unlawfulness by virtue of violating some legal statute
Translations

outlawry

[ˈaʊtlɔːrɪ] Nbandolerismo m

outlawry

nÄchtung f; (= defiance)Gesetzlosigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
More than a single raider had accounted to her steady nerves and cool aim for his outlawry; more than a single pony raced, riderless, in the wake of the charging horde.
These midnight hours were fateful ones to Jurgis; in them was the beginning of his rebellion, of his outlawry and his unbelief.
I tell ye, yeomen, that even those among ye who have been branded with outlawry have had from me protection; for I have pitied their miseries, and curst the oppression of their tyrannic nobles.
Another summer passed on apace, and still neither King nor Sheriff nor Bishop could catch the outlaws, who, meanwhile, thrived and prospered mightily in their outlawry. The band had been increased from time to time by picked men such as Arthur-a-Bland and David of Doncaster--he who was the jolliest cobbler for miles around--until it now numbered a full sevenscore of men; seven companies each with its stout lieutenant serving under Robin Hood.
1471 under sentence of outlawry by the victorious Edward IV.
Tom and East had during the period of their outlawry visited the farm in question for felonious purposes, and on one occasion had conquered and slain a duck there, and borne away the carcass triumphantly, hidden in their handkerchiefs.
On a dark, misty, raw morning in January, I had left a hostile roof with a desperate and embittered heart--a sense of outlawry and almost of reprobation- to seek the chilly harbourage of Lowood: that bourne so far away and unexplored.
and punishment is key to outlawry's constitutionality, as the next
"Studies in Outlawry: The Strange Career of Josey Wales." Quarterly Review of Film and Video 22 (2005): 155-67.
It allows the criminal to escape detection; it facilitates outlawry; it can be used to carry concealed firearms; it offers a hiding place for illegitimate babies.
Punishments of this sort are extremely common historically: outlawry, infamy, exile, excommunication, attainder, and civil death form a chain of exclusionary punishments across the centuries.
Legitimate differences were determined by rules, as was outlawry. Feuds, vengeance and even duels were all regulated by the laws of society.