outraise

outraise

(ˌaʊtˈreɪz)
vb (tr)
to raise more than or higher than
References in periodicals archive ?
Dark horse candidates have limited abilities or hopes to overperform against low expectations, and most presidential nomination decisions are biased toward the front-runner who can outraise, outpoll, and outshine her opponents during the "invisible" primary period before the first primaries and caucuses (Steger 2000).
See Terry Ganey, Supporters of Prop B to Regulate Dog Breeders Outraise Opponents, ST.
21 headline, "Democrats Outraise Republicans 2-to-1" on the website of the Democratic National Committee.
39) Incumbents regularly outraise and outspend challengers by as much as sixty-to-one.
With trips to Wall Street boardrooms and calls to PACs, Boschwitz will probably outraise Wellstone in the final month.
Indeed, according to a careful analysis commissioned by the NDN, well-established groups such as the AFL-CIO, the League of Conservation Voters, and Planned Parenthood are set to outraise and outspend the 527s on issue ads during the 2004 election cycle.
This year's Coldwell Banker Northern California campaign is appropriately titled, "Take the Habitat Challenge -- Outbuild, Outraise and Outgive," and features a light-hearted Habitat "Survivor Island" theme.
As a whole, Republicans routinely outraise and outspend Democrats, and that's been especially so since Democrats lost control of Congress in 1994.
Stein tapped Riordan supporters and others to outraise the incumbent in campaign financing.
Every four years, the GOP outraises and outspends the Democratic Party, usually by tens of millions of dollars.
Outraises all other Republican candidates combined, outraises Obama