outraise

outraise

(ˌaʊtˈreɪz)
vb (tr)
to raise more than or higher than
References in periodicals archive ?
"Our goal is not to outraise Larry Hogan, because doing so isn't necessary for victory," Travis Tazelaar, chairman of Jealous' campaign, wrote in a memo released to reporters.
Hogan in 2014 ran the first successful publicly financed campaign for governor in Maryland, proving he did not have to outraise or outspend his Democratic opponent in a contest where nearly $24 million was spent -- much of it by the Democrats.
21 headline, "Democrats Outraise Republicans 2-to-1" on the website of the Democratic National Committee.
A report in USA Today noted that this will practically guarantee that Paul will "outraise his rivals for the Republican nomination in the fourth quarter and likely will be able to fund a presence in many of the states that vote Feb.
Indeed, according to a careful analysis commissioned by the NDN, well-established groups such as the AFL-CIO, the League of Conservation Voters, and Planned Parenthood are set to outraise and outspend the 527s on issue ads during the 2004 election cycle.
As a whole, Republicans routinely outraise and outspend Democrats, and that's been especially so since Democrats lost control of Congress in 1994.
And eight actually managed to outraise their incumbent Republican opponents.
But a handful of deep-pocketed sources are helping Republicans outraise their opponents in many of those races, even in districts that Democrats view as likely pickups, according to a Texas Tribune review of campaign finance records in a dozen state House races widely considered the most competitive.
Every four years, the GOP outraises and outspends the Democratic Party, usually by tens of millions of dollars.