outscoop

outscoop

(ˌaʊtˈskuːp)
vb (tr)
to surpass in scooping
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The rush to outscoop the competition has always been a part of journalism, but the Internet has accelerated this.
Soon after founding Insider.com, he spent a bundle trying to outscoop entertainment staples such as Variety.
Everybody is trying to outscoop and outsensationalize the other guy."
By late night, around 8 p.m., we retired to the National Press Club on Magallanes drive for dinner, and over drinks of vodka tonic on payday, beer the rest of the month we traded dreams of a free press with the self-same reporters we tried to outscoop earlier in the afternoon.
For her part, Quintos-de Jesus bemoaned that even amid the changing landscape, 'media still live in [their own] caves,' unwilling, for example, to join the coverage of a major issue once a competitor outscoops the rest.
somebody who empathizes with the people around him." This time, however, CNN had lots of competition, which may have pushed the network more toward the conventional so as not to be outscooped. "We're sending out everything we've got," said Anthony Massey of the BBC, CNN's major global news competitor.