outsider


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out·sid·er

 (out-sī′dər)
n.
1.
a. One who is excluded from or does not belong to a group, association, or set.
b. One who is isolated or detached from the activities or concerns of his or her own community.
2. A contestant given little chance of winning; a long shot.

out·si′der·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

outsider

(ˌaʊtˈsaɪdə)
n
1. a person or thing excluded from or not a member of a set, group, etc
2. (Horse Racing) a contestant, esp a horse, thought unlikely to win in a race
3. Canadian (in the north) a person who does not live in the Arctic regions
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

out•sid•er

(ˌaʊtˈsaɪ dər)

n.
a person not part of a particular group.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.outsider - someone who is excluded from or is not a member of a group
stranger, unknown, alien - anyone who does not belong in the environment in which they are found
transalpine - one living on or coming from the other side of the Alps from Italy
2.outsider - a contestant (human or animal) not considered to have a good chance to win
contestant - a person who participates in competitions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

outsider

noun stranger, incomer, visitor, foreigner, alien, newcomer, intruder, new arrival, unknown, interloper, odd one out, nonmember, newbie (slang), outlander We were made to feel like outsiders.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

outsider

noun
A person coming from another country or into a new community:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
شَخْص أو حِصان قَليل الحَظ في الفَوْزشَخْص خارِج المَجْموعَه، مَنْبوذ
étrangertravailleur en marge
nem bennfentesnem esélyes
ólíklegur sigurvegariutanaîkomandi
nezasvätený/cudzí človekoutsider

outsider

[ˈaʊtˈsaɪdəʳ] N
1. (= stranger) → forastero/a m/f, desconocido/a m/f (pej) → intruso/a m/f
2. (= independent) → persona f independiente, persona f ajena al asunto
I'm an outsider in these matterssoy un profano en estos asuntos
3. (in horse race) → caballo m que no figura entre los favoritos; (in election) → candidato m poco conocido (pej) → segundón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

outsider

[ˌaʊtˈsaɪdər] n
(in village, community)étranger/ère m/f
(without links to company)personne f recrutée à l'extérieur
Fiorina is the first true outsider to run the company → Fiorina est la première PDG de la société recrutée à l'extérieur.
(not involved in situation)tiers m
He looks at the system as an outsider → Il considère le système d'un point de vue extérieur.
(in race, competition)outsider m/foutside right nailier moutside toilet nWC m extérieur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

outsider

nAußenseiter(in) m(f), → Outsider m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

outsider

[ˌaʊtˈsaɪdəʳ] n (stranger) → estraneo/a; (in racing, contest) → outsider m/f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

outside

(ˈautsaid) noun
the outer surface. The outside of the house was painted white.
(ˈautsaid) adjective
1. of, on, or near the outer part of anything. the outside door.
2. not part of (a group, one's work etc). We shall need outside help; She has a lot of outside interests.
3. (of a chance etc) very small.
(autˈsaid) adverb
1. out of, not in a building etc. He went outside; He stayed outside.
2. on the outside. The house looked beautiful outside.
(autˈsaid) preposition
on the outer part or side of; not inside or within. He stood outside the house; He did that outside working hours.
outˈsider noun
1. a person who is not part of a group etc.
2. (in a race etc) a runner who is not expected to win. The race was won by a complete outsider.
at the ˌoutˈside
at the most. I shall be there for an hour at the outside.
outside in
turned so that the inside and outside change places. You're wearing your jersey outside in.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They had little private jokes of their own which, unintelligible to the outsider, amused them enormously.
They then play up to the idea by leaving this bicycle in the park as proof of the existence of some outsider. The stain on the windowsill conveys the same idea.
I had been told that he regarded me as a rank outsider. He raised not only his eyes, but his eyebrows as well, at the sound I made pulling back my chair.
How can you talk about being like a book, when it makes even me, an outsider, feel sick?
Yet Trent knew that he was a type of that class which would look upon him as an outsider, and a black sheep, until he had bought his standing.
Of course, I'm an ignorant outsider; but I should fancy theory and its application will have its influence on the laborer too."
I 'm an outsider, and they only accept me on Fan's account; so I sit in a corner and sew, while they chatter and laugh."
Roach was startled one day when he received orders from Master Colin's room to the effect that he must report himself in the apartment no outsider had ever seen, as the invalid himself desired to speak to him.
Then it was that the others, the outsiders, were there.
"Outsiders are allowed five-minute speeches," the sick man urged.
Presently the sound of singing made the outsiders quicken their steps, and, stealing up, they peeped in at one of the broken windows.
Though presenting a firm front to outsiders, no Wilcox could live near, or near the possessions of, any other Wilcox.