outsoar

out·soar

 (out-sôr′)
tr.v. out·soared, out·soar·ing, out·soars
To soar beyond or to a higher place than.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

outsoar

(ˌaʊtˈsɔː)
vb (tr)
to fly higher than
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
A rigid system of design and contracting rules would never have enabled the crown jewel of American aeronautics, a plane conceived to outrun and outsoar everything shot at it or flown in pursuit after it, to see the light of day.
His schoolboy smile and personal charm gain the funds that will eventually permit Gordo Cooper to outsoar all other astronauts.
None has outsoared [ubersprungen] its own time; all of them have comprehended the spirit of their own time in thought.
A line from the elegy, "He has outsoared the shadow of our night," is neatly written, like an epitaph, below the square.
In contradistinction one might claim that had Coleridge got to the 'real' he would have outsoared not only Plato but St Paul!
outsoars, and the shade is deep in the carob trees.
Keats/Adonais, in contrast, "has outsoared the shadows of our night" (352), enacting the sort of transformation not available to the rest of us, collectively figured as a Hamlet who views "all the uses of this world" as having grown "weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable," and the world itself as "an unweeded garden / That grows to seed" (1.2.133-36.).
eagle that "outsoared the shadow of our night," and