over-busy

over-busy

adj
too busy
vb (tr) , -busies, -busying or -busied
to make too busy
References in periodicals archive ?
Well removed from what can look like assembly-line justice in over-busy urban courts is the rural court of Judge Allie Greenleaf Maldonado in Petoskey, Michigan:
They are popular without being ov ca over-busy and are within easy striking distance of capital city Ljubljana.
The final chapter's focus on the materiality of testamentary performance offers an ambitious and intriguing conclusion to a book that is at once rich and occasionally over-busy, but which, through its commitment to the literary texture of Shakespeare's drama, never loses sight of the element of 'play', which Watt calls out the postmoderns for 'forgetting' (23); nor does it neglect the animating power of Shakespeare's poetry.
The food menu is varied, verging on the over-busy (which was the principle problem with Barluga, whose kitchens simply couldn't cope with the ambition of the offering).
When the first break was called, everybody turned around and asked questions to glorify their over-busy schedules and tried to fathom some philosophical sense to justify their presence on a set where nobody, including the host and the director, recognized them.
The score is cluttered and over-busy, for all its witty commentary.
This is a bubbling and over-busy production for the sweet-voiced, widescreen Yorkshire band.
'Ground-up' maps are also covered: this is cartography as personal history, represented here by Harriet McDougall's Bumpkin's Guide to Living in New Cross and Stephen Waiter's over-busy The Island series.
"We've not got an over-busy Christmas period but we've got some tough games and I want them as fresh as I can.
"In today's world, most of us feel over-busy, overworked and over-connected," Nelli added.
But because of its size and unusual set-up of its nightlife - almost entirely contained within shopping centres, with bars and clubs opening once the shops have shut - it's rarely noisy or feels over-busy.
Because our over-busy and electronically mediated lives estrange us from the natural world and its benefits, he offers a vision for a future based on what he terms the "Nature Principle," in which we mend that rift and restore our right relationship with the outdoors for the sake of our health, creativity, spiritual well-being, and basic survival.