overarousal

overarousal

(ˌəʊvərəˈraʊzəl)
n
(Physiology) an excessive or abnormal degree of arousal
References in periodicals archive ?
Calm breath work arid meditative practices help still the mind and decrease physiologic overarousal.
Test anxiety refers to the self-deprecating thoughts (cognitive response), feelings of worry, dread, and tension (affective responses), and physiological overarousal and somatic symptoms (behavioral responses) that accompany individuals' concerns about possible failure in any test situations (Zeidner, 1998).
In fact, patients will learn how to enhance the desirable EEG frequencies associated with relaxed attention and how to reduce the undesirable frequencies which are associated with under- or overarousal [18].
Within the category of arousal regulation we include insomnia, agitation, and hypervigilance, as well as general overarousal. Within the domain of affect regulation we include the anxiety-depression spectrum, the capacity for attachment and empathy, and the personality disorders.
Also, its existence in the formal psychiatric nomenclature would alert clinicians to be vigilant regarding ASAD; that's crucial because recurrences can be lethal, and recognition of the prodromal overarousal symptoms may head off a full-blown crisis.
(5) While research has confirmed the detrimental nature that sleeplessness and fatigue pose to vigilance, other researchers have emphasized the role of cognitive underarousal (boredom) or overarousal (overload) in contributing to lapses in attention and performance.
They can then both connect with others--even those whose socioeconomic, cultural, or physiological experience is very different from their own--and prevent "empathic overarousal," which can lead to personal distress, egoistic behaviors, or burnout (Eisenberg, 2000).
This results in a state of neurological overarousal, under-arousal, or unstable arousal.
This 21-item scale assesses the states of depression, anxiety, and chronic overarousal. This measure has been shown to have high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.87 to 0.94; Antony, Bieling, Cox, Enns, & Swinson, 1998) and discriminant validity.
Deficiencies in psychosocial functioning often lead to self-incrimination and despair and range from shyness caused by cognitive and emotional overarousal to overt hostility (Hallowell & Ratey, 1994).
As a result of prior sensitization (abuse), he is at greater risk for developing a chronically maladaptive intrusive overarousal, behavioral constriction and avoidance, and in many cases increased disruptive or aggressive behaviors that seem context specific.