overbrim

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overbrim

(ˌəʊvəˈbrɪm)
vb, -brims, -brimming or -brimmed
poetic to flow over the edges (of)
References in classic literature ?
And suddenly he recalled how they used to go to bed together as children, and how they only waited till Fyodor Bogdanitch was out of the room to fling pillows at each other and laugh, laugh irrepressibly, so that even their awe of Fyodor Bogdanitch could not check the effervescing, overbrimming sense of life and happiness.
One could have eaten a meal off the ground without overbrimming the proverbial peck of dirt.
where an overbrimming, totally resourceful expressiveness becomes suddenly available .
Later in his Attempt, Nietzsche argues that this interest in the sublime and the tragic myth, "severe will to pessimism", the "demand for ugliness'" and the affirmation of the "fearsome, wicked, mysterious, annihilating and fateful at the very foundation of existence" are the symptoms of the Dionysiac madness (as represented in the 'satyr'), a madness that results from strength, overbrimming health and an excess of plenitude that spawned both tragedy and comedy.
Against such documentary paucity, the overbrimming archive of fan mail has seemed to offer enormously fruitful openings.
Nonetheless, a good many Social Security supporters continue the falsehood about a trust fund overbrimming with money.
Pixie and guests were even forced to use the overbrimming toilets - and weren't able to wash their hands.
This surfeit places Lvov not alone--it is not a sole perfection--but among the whole, rich, overbrimming world.
The Royals' absence seemed to matter little, for, as the Guardian put it, the city's "cup of fealty was found to be overbrimming.
The overbrimming of tears from an eye can indicate either that the normal tear production is not draining down the tear ducts adequately or that an excessive amount of tear production is taking place and is overwhelming the tear duct mechanism.
The image in "To Autumn" of overbrimming cells echoes "Fill for me a brimming bowl" and seems to suggest a promise of release but, in presenting an excessive fluidity, really illustrates constant agitation with no ultimate consummation: "To set budding more, / And still more .
Its setting and period details are classic early Wallace, overbrimming with broad satire of the metaspectacular society in our near future.