overbroad

overbroad

(ˌəʊvəˈbrɔːd)
adj
1. not specific enough
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) rare (of an accent) too strong or pronounced
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the provisions, however, include terms that are overbroad and too imprecise to serve as legal provisions intended to determine whether or not a judge may be removed from office.
President Tokaev should lift restrictions on peaceful assembly and freedom of speech and the media, revise overbroad criminal charges and stop using them to target government critics, and ensure the rights of children with disabilities.
This unpredecented interpretation of the overbroad law could make suspects out of all manner of reporters and editors working closely with sources to encourage them to get, and then making public, classified materials.
The Justice Department has called Nadler's subpoena "overbroad and extraordinarily burdensome".
Roberts found that, while Ward undoubtedly had exposed his genitals to his girlfriend in the course of the sexual encounter, the statute was unconstitutionally overbroad when applied in such circumstances.
The group said the proclamation grants powers that are "overbroad and undefined, effectively suspending and curtailing other rights and guarantees under the 1987 Constitution." Martial law should be stopped as it "resulted in an environment of continued impunity directed against lumad schools, which have been harassed, intimidated and red tagged,"it added.
They pointed out that the proclamation on martial law "grants powers that are overbroad and undefined effectively suspending and curtailing other rights and guarantees under the 1987 Constitution."
Even if there is a possibility of partial enforcement, courts are likely to rule that a party seeking to enforce a facially overbroad agreement is unlikely to succeed on the merits of its claim.
Margaret McKeown wrote that the law "criminalized innocent behavior, was staggeringly overbroad, and that the purpose of the statute was, in large part, targeted at speech and investigative journalists." But the panel also ruled Idaho's law correctly criminalized those who made false statements to either obtain records at an agricultural facility or to obtain employment with the intent to inflict harm.
Sasnett first argues that the provision at issue is unenforceable because it is susceptible to interpretations of "client" and "competing services" that render it functionally overbroad. In particular, Sasnett argues that the restrictive covenant bars him from "providing any 'intelligence analysis' services to any governmental entities to which TechINT has ever marketed." The court does not find this argument persuasive.
According to UN human rights experts the bill is overbroad and vague and fails to provide adequate steps to identify, assist, and protect victims.