overcivilized

overcivilized

(ˌəʊvəˈsɪvɪˌlaɪzd) or

overcivilised

adj
excessively civilized
References in classic literature ?
So beautiful is she that I am always having difficulty in remembering that she is a primitive, half-savage cave girl of the stone age, and often find myself mentally limiting her ca-pacities to those of the effete and overcivilized beauties of the outer crust.
This was not only an expression of the lasting impact of Holmes's searing Civil War experience on his professional life but also, as Jackson Lears has suggested, an anti-modernist protest against the "overcivilized gentility and intellectualism" of late nineteenth century culture and an attempt to restore a sense of purpose, if not meaning, to the universe.
There's a recurring theme in cable dramas that criminality is, if not admirable, at least more authentic and exhilarating than the overcivilized straight life.
Muir echoes Thoreau, writing of the "thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, overcivilized people" who "are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity" (1901, 1).
In fact, it was during the eighteen-nineties that the term "overcivilized" came into common usage.
It was generally believed that conspicuous consumption and leisure culture have a feminizing effect on the upper classes; thus, leisure culture inevitably produces overcivilized men who lack vitality and virility, traits the working class possesses in abundance.
Lorimer filled his letters with warnings about the common failings of overcivilized college men, along with anecdotes covering how a college education could prove useful in forming a future leader.
This genre of literature, he notes, typically portrays the narrator: 'overcivilized', or individuals shattered by misfortune, meeting 'an indigenous spiritual teacher who immerses them in the ocean of spiritual wisdom.
Already with "Canzon: The Yearly Slain" we have seen that he could blend the myth of Persephone with the myth of the death of love in a way that carries more conviction than even Swinburne's blending, because it has an added freshness of verse technique that Swinburne, sophisticated, overeducated, overcivilized even in his sexual perversion, could not reach.
(88-89) (33) As the emphasis in this passage on the distinction between the jagged "truth" about Saddle Meadows Pierre discovers by way of his "extraordinary emergency" and that of the "gilded'(overcivilized) American "world" his mother embodies suggests, what is crucial about Pierre; or, The Ambiguities in this context--what not only essentially differentiates this domestic novel of manners from, but implicitly renders it profoundly critical of, both the "tonal" content and form of Austen's Mansfield Park--is Melville's overdetermination of the ontological site: the disclosure, more specifically, of the nothingness at the origins of being.
Their treatises, sermons, and institutions defined a Christian ideal that placed manliness and physicality, vigor and strenuousness, above theological erudition, pastoral service, and other allegedly sissified, overcivilized pursuits.
Suzanna's best friend and confidant is Max, the living embodiment of overcivilized manhood in David Wilson Barnes' riveting perf: too smart, too clever, too controlled and too, too sad for words.