overclass


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o·ver·class

 (ō′vər-klăs′)
n.
The upper social stratum of society, composed of wealthy and professional people, especially when viewed as controlling society's economic power.

overclass

(ˌəʊvəˈklɑːs)
n
(Sociology) a dominant group in society

o•ver•class

(ˈoʊ vərˌklæs, -ˌklɑs)
n.
a social stratum consisting of educated and wealthy persons considered to control the economic power of a country.
[1960–65]
References in periodicals archive ?
Even before this constituency asserted itself, Chinese Americans and other observers had wondered whether Asians would become honorary' Whites, members of a privileged majority "overclass," instead of welcoming the status of "people of color." (31) To add Asian Americans to racial narratives, adopting a paradigm "beyond black and white," does not indicate whether Asian Americans will be inserted in the black or the white side of the line.
At this point, the reason is clear: the virtually automatic concentration of wealth and power, which has been observed to occur under both capitalism and socialism, fractionates humanity into an overclass and an underclass between which all else is crushed out of existence as though by the jaws of a vise.
"Underclass, Overclass, Ruling Class, Supernova Class." Chap.
But while it's possible that a Bourbon Restoration scenario awaits, in which our overclass learns nothing and forgets nothing during the Trumpian disruption, there is something mildly encouraging in the willingness of Merkel's competitors in the political centre, not just on the extreme right, to act as though they've learned lessons from her high-minded blunder, and to campaign and negotiate as if the public's opinions about migration policy should actually prevail.
But while it's possible that a Bourbon Restoration scenario awaits, in which our overclass learns nothing and forgets nothing during the Trumpian disruption, there is something mildly encouraging in the willingness of Merkel's competitors in the political center, not just on the extreme right, to act as though they've learned lessons from her high-minded blunder, and to campaign and negotiate as if the public's opinions about migration policy should actually prevail.
(3) D.Dorling, 'Underclass, overclass, ruling class, supernova class', in A.Walker, A.Sinfield and C.Walker, eds., Fighting Poverty, Inequality and Injustice, Bristol, 2011, http://www.dannydorling.org/?page_id=2446.
For example, they raise a point about the structure of post-Singularity society: "Nobody wants a transhumanist overclass, except people who imagine themselves in it." If I saw such a person when I looked in the mirror, I would not appreciate the authors reminding their readers that there are such people.
And not just for the tiny overclass that can afford to get organic dapple dandy pluots from Frog Hollow Farm delivered to their door via Goodeggs.com.
George Osborne's weekend gift of a 5p cut in the top income tax rate is the ConDem scoundrels feather-bedding the overclass.
Then as now, Americans were baffled by wars that their overclass had so thoughtfully provided them.
Mi Guadalupe was there always during those "decades of nights" it took to earn degrees, and even more, to earn a place to live in a world that so shuns those not like the overclass. She whispered, "I crossed a long desert with little means, and so can you."
Those places--for instance, the Valleys San Fernando and Santa Clara (redubbed Silicon)--long ago either disgorged their native-born residents to cities and states farther inland and replaced them with immigrants (the fate of Van Nuys, for instance) or else, if blessed with enough charm, proximity, or some other irreducible virtue, became so expensive that only California's lavishly paid professional overclass can possibly afford them (e.g., Palo Alto).