overclassify

overclassify

(ˌəʊvəˈklæsɪfaɪ)
vb, -fies, -fying or -fied
to classify to excess
References in periodicals archive ?
These opinions echoed that of the current Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Porter Goss, who told the 9/11 Commission, while then serving as the Chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, '[W]e overclassify very badly.
53) Another technique that was both popular and effective was to overclassify discovery, declaring almost every scrap of information related to detainees to be classified or otherwise protected, forcing habeas counsel to utilize time-consuming and cumbersome procedures to review documents and submit court filings.
18) The American tendency to overclassify everything does not help.
Hamilton speaks to the lack of incentives stating, "As we say in our report, there is this very strong urge, which every one of you has encountered, to overclassify.
In an August executive order, "Strengthening the Sharing of Terrorism Information to Protect Americans" President Bush called for reining in the government's tendency to overclassify.
One thing I've noticed is, if you overclassify at the front-end, you create an administrative nightmare at the declassification level.
However, because funds increase in direct proportion to the number of students served, there is an inherent incentive to overclassify students and leave them in low-cost placements (Hartman, 1980).