overcompliance

overcompliance

(ˌəʊvəkəmˈplaɪəns)
n
excessive compliance
References in periodicals archive ?
This is despite OPEC's stunning overcompliance with the production cuts the organization agreed with its 10 non-OPEC allies, known as OPEC+ last December.
Most relevant here, scholars of law and economics have predicted that vague legal rules will sometimes lead to overcompliance. (307) Overcompliance may prove advantageous by avoiding costly and distracting conflicts.
Overcompliance gives the Saudis headroom to increase production, but the kingdom seems averse to doing anything preemptively.
Oil supply remains squeezed; overcompliance and higher crude prices led to pressure from major oil consumers; as well as the revival in US shale production, which has nearly offset the planned cuts.
Overcompliance and the holding of large buffers is typically associated in the data to smaller banks.
compliance or overcompliance during the term of the loan.
Gangopadhyay, "Toward a theoretical model of voluntary overcompliance," Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, vol.
(in press) demonstrated that legitimacy and procedural justice considerations motivate compliance and overcompliance only in such direct interactions.
And the hangover effect of a decade of stringent (and costly) enforcement has generated a culture of overcompliance in the international financial sector, since institutional due diligence is an integral dimension of the industry's viability.
(49.) "This overcompliance [of intermediaries] demonstrates a real chilling effect on freedom of expression, as many intermediaries are overwhelmed with requests or do not have the legal expertise to properly handle them in a manner that protects freedom of expression." Patry, supra note 40 at 6.
Kirchhoff (2000) analyzes the effects of eco-labeling on a monopolist's voluntary overcompliance under asymmetric information about the firm's environmental impacts.