overconcern

overconcern

(ˌəʊvəkənˈsɜːn)
vb (tr)
to concern excessively
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References in periodicals archive ?
This overconcern with body image is profoundly influenced by beauty standards propagated by cultural and mediatic messages (Croll, 2005) and it can lead to "restrictive dieting and unhealthy weight control methods" causing "potentially dangerous disordered eating behaviors" (Croll, 2005, p.
A key pathway in this model, specifically bulimic behavior, is the link between overconcern with weight and shape and the adoption of binge eating and purging (Jung, & Lee, 2006).
Paradoxically, an overconcern for morality has its own downside in the form of moral zealotry.
(The Valukas team could find no evidence that any sort of cost-benefit analysis or overconcern with costs entered into the resolution of safety issues.) But in the case of the ignition switch, the decision to classify the problem as "customer convenience" began the disastrous chain of events that culminated in the product recall some nine years later.
Body-checking is a behavioral manifestation of body dissatisfaction and overconcern with shape and weight (11) and includes any behavior oriented to verify the body appearance and physical state held constant by means of weighing, measuring body parts (i.e., waist and abdomen in women and biceps and chest in men) and analysis of the body in mirror.
of habitability, including overconcern on the part of judges with
In eating pathology, schemas reflect an overconcern with food, weight, and/or shape (Cooper and Fairburn 1992).
(255.) See, e.g., Dreyfuss, supra note 8, at 795-96 (noting that Federal Circuit jurisprudence displays an overconcern for precision at the expense of accuracy); Rai, supra note 7, at 1115 (noting that "there can be no serious dispute that the Federal Circuit's jurisprudence is formalist in its orientation"); Thomas, supra note 226, at 774 (noting that the Federal Circuit patent jurisprudence "runs a common thread: the drift toward simple rules").
This overconcern, however, was unrelated to any fear of appearing foolish in front of their teacher and their peers.
Anxiety is defined as a neurosis characterized by excessive worry and overconcern. It is frequently associated with somatic symptoms, such as restlessness, sleep disturbance, and difficulty concentrating (Menon et al., 2003).
Her tendency to overconcern and her having to take on too much responsibility as a teenager suggested Calcarea.