overcontrolling

overcontrolling

(ˌəʊvəkənˈtrəʊlɪŋ)
adj
excessively controlling
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The pilot reacts to the increased airspeed with back pressure, tightening the turn and increasing the rate of descent into what was known even then as the "graveyard spiral." Pilots who avoid an unintended bank are prone to begin overcontrolling as they chase the airspeed indicator and altimeter, falling farther and farther behind the airplane.
That day, Sipe gave me documents and leads on how Peterson was ousted from a previous clerical facility, outside Boston, for drinking and overcontrolling behavior.
One small 2012 study found that anxious and inhibited kids whose mothers tended to be overprotective were more likely to have anxiety disorders during adolescence than those whose mothers were not overcontrolling. The implication is that parents who tried to shield their children from experiences that made them anxious actually prevented them from learning to be unafraid.
* finding an external locus of attention as a distraction from overcontrolling;
D., licensed psychologist and author of Even June Cleaver Would Forget the Juice Box, called helicopter parenting "overparenting." "It means being involved in a child's life in a way that is overcontrolling, overprotecting, and overperfecting, in a way that is in excess of responsible parenting," says Dr.
AFDD 6-0, Command and Control, speaks to a balance between too much and too little centralized control: "Overcontrolling air and space power robs it of flexibility, taking away initiative from operators.
For such detractors, however much the bodily horror described in Amour differs from the torture Haneke typically depicts, the overcontrolling manner in which he applies his lessons retains his air of schoolmasterly arrogation.
Eighteen percent of primary caregivers were thought to use excessive discipline, and 6% were considered overcontrolling. Over one-fourth (27%) of the children were identified as having special needs, and 11% had a delinquency history.
to settle on claims not believe This is the very same overcontrolling mindset that gives rise to the trend to place a complex series of traffic lights at roundabouts - the local government planners love the extra layer of system and regulation despite the overwhelming evidence that the extra control imposed hinders the natural flow of traffic.
Conversely, they may attempt resolution of such ambiguous or challenging aspects of health care through overcontrolling responses (e.g., becoming angry or coercive in difficult clinical encounters or in dealing with medical team conflict), which we term "negative assertive control." Loss of control and such maladaptive efforts to regain a sense of control can result in a failure to effectively deal with important patient care and health care system issues, and may in some cases be an important contributing factor to physician job stress, alcohol and substance abuse, and impaired mental health, all conditions in the general population that have been theoretically and/or empirically linked to lack of sense of control (Astin, S.