overdiscount

overdiscount

(ˌəʊvəˈdɪskaʊnt)
vb (tr)
to discount excessively
References in periodicals archive ?
"[N]on-compete agreements constrain employees only in a fairly remote and uncertain future event; and we may expect employees to overdiscount the likelihood of these events or the importance of the rights at stake." (60)
"[P]oliticians in democratic states, who are elected for relatively short periods and who are judged by voters largely in terms of the immediate results of their actions, also have strong incentives to overdiscount the future in the policy-making process." (69) Consequently, their viewpoints are necessarily shortsighted, and future generations cannot intervene.
(96) Arbitration and non-compete agreements constrain employees only in a fairly remote and uncertain future event; and we may expect employees to overdiscount the likelihood of these events or the importance of the rights at stake.
The correct response to these political and economic risks is not to overdiscount future cash flows and therefore bid too low or not bid at all, but to include clauses that protect one against those risks.
Overdiscounted buys: Partners or customers purchase a large number of products when in fact they need a smaller quantity of products in order to achieve volume discounts.