overdocument

overdocument

(ˌəʊvəˈdɒkjʊˌmɛnt)
vb (tr)
to document excessively
References in periodicals archive ?
The first could actually be considered a strength, instead of a weakness: I find that the author seems to overdocument various points, drawing continually on other sources to support particular interpretations.
In addition to federal backsliding on provisions of the original regulation, there is anecdotal evidence that confusion among state regulators over Title V requirements also contributed to overcompliance behaviors by leading complying companies to overdocument emissions information.
It would be unkind to overdocument the existence of this "critical" position, subjected to such unexpected critique, and Walkerdine and Lucy (1989:192) must represent an entire genre.
Many times, agencies overdocument, inundating the auditors.
Agencies and attorneys often encourage workers to overdocument to
"Be careful not to overdocument," cautions Michael Caruso of Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
That is, they write humorless, overdocumented tracts because insecure editors confuse documentation with substance.").
I think we're all getting overdocumented these days."
What's more, paper itself poses a particular cognitive challenge to housekeepers because, in an overdocumented society that issues a constant stream of receipts, check stubs, time sheets, warranties, and invoices, the difference between an announcement for a Publishing Clearing House sweepstakes and a deed for an oil well is not immediately apparent.
On the other, they look more robust than they actually are: sources are overdocumented, cross-references are not concise, some materials seem to be unexamined (these entries are not marked), and worst, one gets the impression that Lane is "filling in." (For example, see entry 932 for an extensive annotation that never discusses the article itself.) An effective research tool should have specific information about the resources, and many cited items, including the trombone article in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (London: Macmillan, 1980), merit their own entries.