pacing

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pace 1

 (pās)
n.
1. A step made in walking; a stride.
2. A unit of length equal to 30 inches (0.76 meter).
3. The distance spanned by a step or stride, especially:
a. The modern version of the Roman pace, measuring five English feet. Also called geometric pace.
b. Thirty inches at quick marching time or 36 at double time.
c. Five Roman feet or 58.1 English inches, measured from the point at which the heel of one foot is raised to the point at which it is set down again after an intervening step by the other foot.
4.
a. The rate of speed at which a person, animal, or group walks or runs.
b. The rate of speed at which an activity or movement proceeds.
5. A manner of walking or running: a jaunty pace.
6. A gait of a horse in which both feet on one side are lifted and put down together.
v. paced, pac·ing, pac·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To walk or stride back and forth across: paced the floor nervously.
b. To measure (a space) by counting the number of steps needed to cover a distance.
c. To walk (a number of steps) in so measuring a space.
2. Sports
a. To set or regulate the rate of speed for (a race or a competitor in a race).
b. To lead (one's team or teammates) with a good performance: paced her team to a victory with 18 points.
3. To advance or develop (something) for a particular purpose or at a particular rate: paced the lectures so as not to overwhelm the students.
4. To train (a horse) in a particular gait, especially the pace.
v.intr.
1. To walk with long deliberate steps.
2. To go at the pace. Used of a horse or rider.
Idiom:
pace (oneself)
To move or make progress at a sensible or moderate rate.

[Middle English, from Old French pas, from Latin passus, from past participle of pandere, to stretch, spread out; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pa·ce 2

 (pä′chā, -kā, pā′sē)
prep.
With the permission of; with deference to. Used to express polite or ironically polite disagreement: I have not, pace my detractors, entered into any secret negotiations.

[Latin pāce, ablative of pāx, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pa′ce adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pacing - (music) the speed at which a composition is to be played
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
musical time - (music) the beat of musical rhythm
accelerando - a gradually increasing tempo of music; "my ear will not accept such violent accelerandos"
allegretto - a quicker tempo than andante but not as fast as allegro
allegro - a brisk and lively tempo
andante - a moderately slow tempo (a walking pace)
meno mosso - played at reduced speed; less rapid
rubato - a flexible tempo; not strictly on the beat
2.pacing - walking with slow regular stridespacing - walking with slow regular strides  
gait - a person's manner of walking
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
An esophageal electrocardiogram showed spontaneous narrow QRS wave tachycardia and auriculoventricular dissociation which could not be terminated by transesophageal overdrive pacing and was not responsive to direct current cardioversion.
Finally, the evidence was insufficient to assess the potential benefits of positional therapy, oropharyngeal exercise, palatal implants, or atrial overdrive pacing for patients who already have dual-chamber pacemakers, Dr.
This section also now states that "serum alkalinization with intravenous sodium bicarbonate and hyperventilation [as needed] should be instituted in patients manifesting significant toxicity such as QRS widening," and that "dysrhythmias despite adequate alkalemia may respond to overdrive pacing, beta-agonist infusions, and magnesium therapy"
The role of overdrive pacing is discussed in detail elsewhere.
Simantirakis and colleagues looked at using atrial overdrive pacing to relieve symptoms of sleep apnea by maintaining heart rate.
In the December 15th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine a group of researchers in Greece report on their observational study comparing atrial overdrive pacing versus CPAP as therapy for OSAHS.