overenrolled

overenrolled

(ˌəʊvərɪnˈrəʊld)
adj
having too many people enrolled
References in periodicals archive ?
She was referring to Uber, which paid P190 million after it was discovered to have overenrolled the number of drivers, and two banks, which were fined for alleged violations.
As their investments draw in more middle-class families, schools can become overenrolled, squeezing out poor students who would benefit from the new resources.
If one department has a lot of overenrolled courses and another a lot of underenrolled courses, he goes with the first one, the winners not the losers.
If these schools were overenrolled, the decision of who would attend was made by a lottery.
Among the objects, a 1974 poster for her always overenrolled Messages and Means course at the VLW stood out.
Latino, black, and API populations are substantially overenrolled in 20,12, and 6 plans, respectively.
1, ruled unconstitutional the Seattle and Louisville school districts' limited use of race in deciding which students got into overenrolled schools (Seattle) or which students could transfer schools (Louisville), limiting the scope of government intervention to preserve racial balance following the expansion of school choice.
University English Departments with only a handful of PhD students at any given time owe their advanced degree programs to the great hordes of students in overenrolled undergraduate English (and math and modern language) courses taught by an ever-increasing number of part-time faculty.
In addition, a report from the National Center on Education Statistics found that large schools, schools in the Southeast, and schools with 50% or more minority enrollment were more likely to be overenrolled by 25% or more (Chaney & Lewis, 2007) according to a survey of school principals.
In a recent study, 30% of public schools reported that they were overenrolled (NCES, 2007), giving credence to the study of movement within and around learning environments.