overexaggerate

overexaggerate

(ˌəʊvərɪɡˈzædʒəˌreɪt)
vb
to exaggerate excessively
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Many of them also noted that the NTS had a tendency to overexaggerate the benefits of the research, downplay the suffering of the animals and provide only vague statements about adherence to the 3Rs.
"I can't overexaggerate how much kinship I feel with that guy."
In the weeks before last November's election, Suu Kyi herself told reporters not to "overexaggerate" the threat facing the Rohingya, and other prominent longtime democrats openly inveighed against the Rohingya, using racist taunts.
We overexaggerate yesterday, we overestimate tomorrow and we underestimate today.
In regard to advertising of tests, "it is necessary to pay attention to deceptive or misleading marketing and advertising, particularly if they overexaggerate the utility of genetic testing [but] simply banning home genetic testing" (93) is regulatory overkill.
"It's almost as if we overexaggerate the need for water," Franco said.
Many people overexaggerate a situation or turn some small event into something big or impossible.
Although Dutch liberalism was, in general, anti-clerical, the growing strength and effectiveness of the Catholic and orthodox Protestant political lobbies tended to overexaggerate liberalism's anti-religious stance.
Just as the selfish passions overexaggerate our joy and pain, so do the senses fall prey to other illusions.
Publicity generated through media sources or liability lawsuits tends to overexaggerate minute environmental risks.
Are these people looking at the same world?' Now I don't want to overexaggerate, but I think this is extremely important," he said.