overfall


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overfall

(ˈəʊvəˌfɔːl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a turbulent stretch of water caused by marine currents over an underwater ridge
2. (Civil Engineering) a mechanism that allows excess water to escape from a dam or lock
3. (Physical Geography) the point at which a sewer or land drainage discharges into the sea or a river
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ensuring that the program was personally meaningful was an important enabler effected by giving men a choice of practical options applicable to their own circumstances, which, by facilitating a sense of personal control overfall risks, led to personally relevant action (Liddle et al., 2016).
While this additional step does help improve the overfall tone of comments, it's hardly a complete solution.
He said it was a matter of great pleasure for the state that players from Haryana have contributed three gold medals to the overfall tally of five.
Rapidly varied flow occurs when the change with length is rapid, such as at a sharp change in slope, over a weir, or a free overfall. With unsteady flow the depth and/or flow rate vary with time along the channel.
The upslope plot border may have contributed to the failure by creating an artificial overfall condition.
Allowing a pool to form naturally at the overfall can easily lead to failure of the structure.
A downslope outlet for the overland flow was installed, incorporating a pit to enable sampling of sediment in runoff, and a metal frame to provide flow constriction, and an overfall to facilitate sampling.
Boards can be used to partially block the inlet to these overfall pipes during the winter, creating shallow ponds.
The Labrador Sea is not the main source of energy for the thermohaline circulation; its contribution is made more in passing, through entrainment of Labrador Sea Water by the deep flow emerging from the overfall of Arctic waters.
It was a relief to boat and skipper when, tide rips and overfall astern, they settled to the more comfortable rhythm of the open Pacific.