overidentify

overidentify

(ˌəʊvəraɪˈdɛntɪˌfaɪ)
vb (tr; intr) , -fies, fying or -fied
(Psychoanalysis) to identify with someone else to an excessive degree
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
When we overidentify with something that resonates deeply in our experience, we know a complex has been created.
This discontentment can trap us: It can lead us either to deny or to overidentify with those parts of our story.
The committee's report recommended the Legislature "determine what aspects of our current funding mechanism for special education encourage overidentification; and then investigate alternative methods for funding special education that decrease any incentives to overidentify students as needing special education services."
The tendency of the NBDS to overidentify some patients as having dysphagia when they really do not is a safety feature of the tool.
Quotas work against these innovations by creating perverse incentives for schools to overidentify students as disabled.
Additionally, schools using the ability-achievement discrepancy model (a) tend to overidentify students for inclusion in special education, especially minority students; (b) take too long to provide appropriate services to students in need, working against early intervention, which has been shown to significantly reduce reading problems in students; and (c) have difficulty determining whether low achievement was a result of an actual learning disability or poor teaching (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2006; NJCLD, 2005).
Past research has established a certain tendency for individuals involved in gymnastics to experience encouragement to overidentify with their role as an athlete (Kerr & Dacyshyn, 2000; Klint & Weiss, 1986; Krane, Greenleaf, & Snow, 1997; Lavallee & Robinson, 2007).
Perhaps in an age when some religious leaders are tempted to overidentify with certain political parties, we might read this book as a cautionary tale.
As a genre it can lead the scholar, who is supposed to be detached, to overidentify with the subject This lack of detachment contributes to biography's popularity among nonacademic readers, who like to read about the exploits of great personalities as models for leading their own lives.
In fact, Davis (1980) advised that the Personal Distress subscale correlates negatively with the other subscales and indicates susceptibility on the part of the listener to overidentify with the difficult emotions of the other person.
However, as mindfulness did not emerge as a significant predictor in the multivariate models, it may be that students who strongly overidentify are most likely to benefit and should be targeted.