overplant

overplant

(ˌəʊvəˈplɑːnt)
vb (tr)
(Agriculture) to plant more than is necessary or possible to sustain
References in periodicals archive ?
With this system, I can plant 20 kinds of tomatoes by putting a cardboard separator in the center of each row, and because the sections are small, I waste less seed as I'm not tempted to overplant.
The site revealed that nearly 60 percent of farm subsidies go to the largest 10 percent of growers--often encouraging big farms to overplant crops to receive more subsidies.
I always overplant and pull out the least attractive plants.
For a more colorful spring display overplant spring-blooming bulbs with early-flowering perennials; the bulbs will grow up between the flowers.
Rural and suburban communities also overplant the species as a shade tree, hastening their spread.
Don't overplant.--Helen Harrison, University of Wisconsin-Madison extension horticulturist
The 1996 Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act took the first step by dismantling the system of subsidizing particular crops, which had encouraged farmers to overplant those crops and overapply fertilizers and pesticides in many cases.
Everyone expects grapes to be in great demand for a few years, then switch back to oversupply as growers overplant, as they always do.
Overplant with cool-season annuals, so when spring comes, the bulb flowers pop up through them.
Brockmeyer reminded attendees of the roughly 10-year cycle for production in the wine business as wineries run out of grapes, then growers begin to overplant. It's three or four years of increasing prices, then four to five years of slowing down.
Another way to reduce labor in a border, he says, is not to overplant. Not only do most of us crowd plants, we also plant too many things.