overprescribe


Also found in: Medical.

o·ver·pre·scribe

 (ō′vər-prĭ-skrīb′)
v. o·ver·pre·scribed, o·ver·pre·scrib·ing, o·ver·pre·scribes
v.intr.
To prescribe an excessive amount of a medication.
v.tr.
To prescribe (a medication) in excess of the amount needed.

o′ver·pre·scrip′tion (-skrĭp′shən) n.

overprescribe

(ˌəʊvəprɪsˈkraɪb)
vb (tr)
(Pharmacology) to prescribe too much of (a medication, etc)
Translations

overprescribe

[əʊvəprɪsˈkraɪb] (Pharm, Med)
A. VIrecetar demasiados medicamentos
B. VTrecetar sin control
References in periodicals archive ?
A federal task force devoted to prosecuting medical professionals who overprescribe opioids in Appalachia has begun operating in the Western District of Virginia.
Paul Gray, head of Scotland's NHS, recently warned that children with emotional problems risk being over-medicalised by doctors who overprescribe drugs and rely too heavily on clinical treatments for young people.
19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lawsuit filed Tuesday in California claims that pharmaceutical company AbbVie used cash, gifts, and services to induce doctors to overprescribe the widely used drug Humira (adalimumab), ignoring the medicine's potentially lethal side effects.
California suit: AbbVie paid docs to overprescribe Humira
She was repeatedly rebuffed by doctors, who, she says, tend to overprescribe medications.
And yet, physicians continue to overprescribe this class of medication.
It also calls on Governments to ensure health-care providers do not overprescribe sedatives, particularly among elderly people, and calls for a realistic assessment of the state of the international precursor control system.
Clinicians tend to overprescribe antibiotics for burn wounds, particularly in children, because they are so concerned about infection.
Many doctors overprescribe just to avoid being called in the middle of the night by a patient in pain.
With all due respect to practitioners in the nursing home, some tend to underprescribe for fear of retribution by the DEA, yet also overprescribe in many cases when other cheaper and simpler options are available--such as using acetaminophen first and then moving to stronger meds, including short-term NSAIDs and then short-acting and long-acting opioids.
Despite the overwhelming evidence, we still continue to overprescribe. Physicians have been reported to prescribe antibiotics based on the perception that parents or patients want them; however, this assessment has not been substantiated.